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7 Iconic Comic Foods in Honor of New York Comic Con (Slideshow)

7 Iconic Comic Foods in Honor of New York Comic Con (Slideshow)


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Superheroes, supervillains, and the things they love to eat

Martian Manhunter

If you came from an alien race after losing your entire family to a martian holocaust, you might look for some comfort food, stat. Martian Manhunter may be a gritty cop by day and a martian superhero by night, but he just can’t get enough of Chocos (basically, Oreos) and is seen munching on his favorite food in several panels.

Deadpool

This anti-hero character is famous for being forward and constantly breaking the fourth wall by addressing readers and acknowledging his silly antics. Another thing Deadpool isn’t shy about? His love of tacos and chimichangas. This superhero is always ordering the tasty Tex-Mex dish after kicking crime’s sorry butt!

Venom

Enemy to Spiderman, and by extension to the whole world, this creepy long-tongued creature has one craving. Your brain!

Galactus

Being a super villain takes a lot of work. Wreaking havoc, plotting revenge, creating plans for world domination — you can’t imagine how much energy it takes. Maybe that is why the ultimate Marvel super villain Galactus is always looking to fuel up on sweet, unsuspecting planets.

Zatanna

The daughter of powerful magician Zatara, this power-wielding superheroine is one of the strongest magic-users in the DC Universe. When she isn’t trying to live up to her father’s reputation, she’s scarfing down tacos through the multiverse.

Superman

Evidently, Kryptonite isn’t Superman’s only weakness. He has a huge soft spot for beef bourguignon with ketchup — especially when his lovely lady Lois Lane makes it for him.

The Avengers

OK, granted that this love is a recent development, but we have to pause and appreciate of one of the comedic-relief scenes in the recent adaptation of The Avengers. After saving the world and witnessing an immeasurable amount of trauma, all the guys want to do is grab their first bite of shawarma.


7 Iconic Comic Foods in Honor of New York Comic Con (Slideshow) - Recipes

by Laura Maggi
Mark Smith, the former lead recruiter responsible for recruiting movie companies to make films in Louisiana, will serve a two-year prison term for accepting bribes in exchange for giving lucrative state tax credits to a film producer, a federal judge ruled today.

U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt told Smith that he believed he was "sincerely remorseful," but said that his actions had tarnished the fledgling movie industry. "We live with the damage today," the judge said, as he put the finishing touches on two-year investigation of how the state awarded benefits to the companies that finance entertainment productions in the state.

Engelhardt said in determining the two-year prison sentence, much less than time Smith could have gotten, he balanced Smith's cooperation with federal investigators after his guilty plea in the fall of 2007 against the damage he wrought by accepting cash bribes from a film producer in exchange for doling out too many lucrative state tax credits.

That cooperation led to others being charged in the case: Malcolm Petal, the co-founder and head of the New Orleans company LIFT Productions and other firms and William Bradley, a Hammond attorney. Both men also pleaded guilty to participating in a conspiracy to bribe a state official.

The bribes, worth $135,000, were channeled from Petal to Bradley, a former law-school friend of Smith, who then split the money with Smith. Engelhardt ordered Smith to pay a $67,5000 fine, saying he couldn't allow him to keep the ill-gotten gains.

"The sentence is fair and justified," Smith told the judge at the end of the proceedings. He was ordered to report to prison on August 31.

As the state's film commissioner, Smith had the authority to determine how many tax credits to award to productions filmed in Louisiana. Federal prosecutors have said he gave "way more" tax credits to Petal than he deserved based on how much money he actually spent.

The credits were valuable because upon receipt producers could sell them at a slight discount, meaning that they generated instant cash.

The focus of the investigation was $1.35 million in tax credits received by one of Petal's companies, Break Beat, for filming the 2003 Voodoo Music Festival.

The sentencing today brings the case to a close. Bradley was sentenced to 10 months in federal prison by U.S. District Judge Lance Africk earlier this month. Petal received the stiffest sentence, a five-year prison term also handed down by Africk.

Africk said at the time that he gave Petal the maximum sentence because his actions bolstered the state's reputation for rampant political corruption at a time when residents are striving to shed that image.

Former La. film official to be sentenced

From The Daily Advertiser
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal judge is set to sentence a former Louisiana film commissioner who pleaded guilty to taking bribe money to secure tax credits for a movie producer.

Mark S. Smith faces a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison when he is sentenced Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt.

Smith served as the state's film commissioner from 2003 to 2005. He pleaded guilty in 2007 to taking about $65,000 in bribes to help movie producer Malcolm Petal secure about $1.3 million in state tax credits for filming live music festivals.

Petal was sentenced in April to five years in prison for his role in the scheme. William Bradley, a lawyer who was the middleman for bribe payments to Smith, was sentenced earlier this month to 10 months in prison.

Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

From The Times-Picayune
Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

Jazz Fest producers are accepting applications for performers for the 2010 event, scheduled for April 23-May 2.

Upwards of 80 percent of the hundreds of acts featured each year at Jazz Fest are Louisiana-based. Bands interested in performing should submit a recording, bio, photo, press clippings, contact information and an email address.

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival presented by Shell
Attn: Music Production
336 Camp Street, Suite 250
New Orleans, LA, 70130.

Applications are available online at the Jazz Fest Web site.

Submission deadline is October 10.

Former Tulane University Historian Douglas Brinkley takes a long, fond look at Theodore Roosevelt

Historian Douglas Brinkley finally has a moment.

Just in from breakfast with C-SPAN founder Brian Lamb, he stops for an interview with his former hometown's newspaper the day before he makes an appearance with Diane Rehm on NPR. Earlier this month he wrote a cover story for Vanity Fair, a postcard from a weeklong cruise in the Caribbean with actor Johnny Depp. Last month there was dinner with President Barack Obama and fellow presidential historians Michael Beschloss, H.W. Brands, Robert Caro, Robert Dallek, Doris Kearns Goodwin, David Kennedy, Kenneth Mack and Garry Wills.

What: Historian Douglas Brinkley signs "The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America" (Harper, $34.99)
When: 1-3 p.m. Saturday
Where: Garden District Book Shop, 2727 Prytania

'Forest Gump' Author Winston Groom Highlights New Orleans Area Visits This Week

Winston Groom
What: The novelist and historian, author of 'Forest Gump,' 'Conversations With the Enemy' and, most recently, 'Vicksburg, 1863,' appears with artist William Dunlap and Ogden Museum of Art director J. Richard Gruber as part of the Southern Storytellers series.
When: Sunday, 2 p.m.
Where: Ogden Museum of Art. For information and to reserve a spot, contact Stephanie Spicer, 504.539.9618.

Jeff L. Rosenheim, curator of photographs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, presents a lecture, 'In the Spirit: The Achievement and Legacy of Michael P. Smith,' today, 6:30 p.m., the Historic New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St. Free, but seating is limited. Call 504.523.4662 for reservations.

Martha Hall Foose signs 'Screen Doors and Sweet Tea: Recipes and Tales From a Southern Cook,' Thursday, 6-8 p.m., during Ogden After Hours, featuring Larry Sieberth & Friends, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Book-signing is free concert is free to museum members, $10 general admission.

Bill Dixon signs 'Last Days of Last Island: The Hurricane of 1856, Louisiana's First Great Storm,' Friday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books, and again Saturday, 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble/Metairie.

Sherry Lee Alexander interviews Travis Bradberry, author of 'Emotional Intelligence 2.0,' Saturday, 8:30 a.m., on Writers' Forum, WRBH-FM radio. Program repeats Sunday at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 p.m.

Douglas Brinkley signs 'The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America,' Saturday, 1-3 p.m., at Garden District Book shop.

Poets Chris Champagne, Danny Kerwick, Martha McFerren and Laura Mattingly present a reading, Saturday, 2-3:30 p.m., Latter Library.

Poets Julie Kane ('Jazz Funeral') and Robin Kemp ('This Pagan Heaven') read from and sign their books, Sunday, 3 p.m., Maple Leaf Bar.

Robin Kemp reads from and signs 'This Pagan Heaven,' Monday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books.


7 Iconic Comic Foods in Honor of New York Comic Con (Slideshow) - Recipes

by Laura Maggi
Mark Smith, the former lead recruiter responsible for recruiting movie companies to make films in Louisiana, will serve a two-year prison term for accepting bribes in exchange for giving lucrative state tax credits to a film producer, a federal judge ruled today.

U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt told Smith that he believed he was "sincerely remorseful," but said that his actions had tarnished the fledgling movie industry. "We live with the damage today," the judge said, as he put the finishing touches on two-year investigation of how the state awarded benefits to the companies that finance entertainment productions in the state.

Engelhardt said in determining the two-year prison sentence, much less than time Smith could have gotten, he balanced Smith's cooperation with federal investigators after his guilty plea in the fall of 2007 against the damage he wrought by accepting cash bribes from a film producer in exchange for doling out too many lucrative state tax credits.

That cooperation led to others being charged in the case: Malcolm Petal, the co-founder and head of the New Orleans company LIFT Productions and other firms and William Bradley, a Hammond attorney. Both men also pleaded guilty to participating in a conspiracy to bribe a state official.

The bribes, worth $135,000, were channeled from Petal to Bradley, a former law-school friend of Smith, who then split the money with Smith. Engelhardt ordered Smith to pay a $67,5000 fine, saying he couldn't allow him to keep the ill-gotten gains.

"The sentence is fair and justified," Smith told the judge at the end of the proceedings. He was ordered to report to prison on August 31.

As the state's film commissioner, Smith had the authority to determine how many tax credits to award to productions filmed in Louisiana. Federal prosecutors have said he gave "way more" tax credits to Petal than he deserved based on how much money he actually spent.

The credits were valuable because upon receipt producers could sell them at a slight discount, meaning that they generated instant cash.

The focus of the investigation was $1.35 million in tax credits received by one of Petal's companies, Break Beat, for filming the 2003 Voodoo Music Festival.

The sentencing today brings the case to a close. Bradley was sentenced to 10 months in federal prison by U.S. District Judge Lance Africk earlier this month. Petal received the stiffest sentence, a five-year prison term also handed down by Africk.

Africk said at the time that he gave Petal the maximum sentence because his actions bolstered the state's reputation for rampant political corruption at a time when residents are striving to shed that image.

Former La. film official to be sentenced

From The Daily Advertiser
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal judge is set to sentence a former Louisiana film commissioner who pleaded guilty to taking bribe money to secure tax credits for a movie producer.

Mark S. Smith faces a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison when he is sentenced Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt.

Smith served as the state's film commissioner from 2003 to 2005. He pleaded guilty in 2007 to taking about $65,000 in bribes to help movie producer Malcolm Petal secure about $1.3 million in state tax credits for filming live music festivals.

Petal was sentenced in April to five years in prison for his role in the scheme. William Bradley, a lawyer who was the middleman for bribe payments to Smith, was sentenced earlier this month to 10 months in prison.

Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

From The Times-Picayune
Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

Jazz Fest producers are accepting applications for performers for the 2010 event, scheduled for April 23-May 2.

Upwards of 80 percent of the hundreds of acts featured each year at Jazz Fest are Louisiana-based. Bands interested in performing should submit a recording, bio, photo, press clippings, contact information and an email address.

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival presented by Shell
Attn: Music Production
336 Camp Street, Suite 250
New Orleans, LA, 70130.

Applications are available online at the Jazz Fest Web site.

Submission deadline is October 10.

Former Tulane University Historian Douglas Brinkley takes a long, fond look at Theodore Roosevelt

Historian Douglas Brinkley finally has a moment.

Just in from breakfast with C-SPAN founder Brian Lamb, he stops for an interview with his former hometown's newspaper the day before he makes an appearance with Diane Rehm on NPR. Earlier this month he wrote a cover story for Vanity Fair, a postcard from a weeklong cruise in the Caribbean with actor Johnny Depp. Last month there was dinner with President Barack Obama and fellow presidential historians Michael Beschloss, H.W. Brands, Robert Caro, Robert Dallek, Doris Kearns Goodwin, David Kennedy, Kenneth Mack and Garry Wills.

What: Historian Douglas Brinkley signs "The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America" (Harper, $34.99)
When: 1-3 p.m. Saturday
Where: Garden District Book Shop, 2727 Prytania

'Forest Gump' Author Winston Groom Highlights New Orleans Area Visits This Week

Winston Groom
What: The novelist and historian, author of 'Forest Gump,' 'Conversations With the Enemy' and, most recently, 'Vicksburg, 1863,' appears with artist William Dunlap and Ogden Museum of Art director J. Richard Gruber as part of the Southern Storytellers series.
When: Sunday, 2 p.m.
Where: Ogden Museum of Art. For information and to reserve a spot, contact Stephanie Spicer, 504.539.9618.

Jeff L. Rosenheim, curator of photographs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, presents a lecture, 'In the Spirit: The Achievement and Legacy of Michael P. Smith,' today, 6:30 p.m., the Historic New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St. Free, but seating is limited. Call 504.523.4662 for reservations.

Martha Hall Foose signs 'Screen Doors and Sweet Tea: Recipes and Tales From a Southern Cook,' Thursday, 6-8 p.m., during Ogden After Hours, featuring Larry Sieberth & Friends, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Book-signing is free concert is free to museum members, $10 general admission.

Bill Dixon signs 'Last Days of Last Island: The Hurricane of 1856, Louisiana's First Great Storm,' Friday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books, and again Saturday, 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble/Metairie.

Sherry Lee Alexander interviews Travis Bradberry, author of 'Emotional Intelligence 2.0,' Saturday, 8:30 a.m., on Writers' Forum, WRBH-FM radio. Program repeats Sunday at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 p.m.

Douglas Brinkley signs 'The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America,' Saturday, 1-3 p.m., at Garden District Book shop.

Poets Chris Champagne, Danny Kerwick, Martha McFerren and Laura Mattingly present a reading, Saturday, 2-3:30 p.m., Latter Library.

Poets Julie Kane ('Jazz Funeral') and Robin Kemp ('This Pagan Heaven') read from and sign their books, Sunday, 3 p.m., Maple Leaf Bar.

Robin Kemp reads from and signs 'This Pagan Heaven,' Monday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books.


7 Iconic Comic Foods in Honor of New York Comic Con (Slideshow) - Recipes

by Laura Maggi
Mark Smith, the former lead recruiter responsible for recruiting movie companies to make films in Louisiana, will serve a two-year prison term for accepting bribes in exchange for giving lucrative state tax credits to a film producer, a federal judge ruled today.

U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt told Smith that he believed he was "sincerely remorseful," but said that his actions had tarnished the fledgling movie industry. "We live with the damage today," the judge said, as he put the finishing touches on two-year investigation of how the state awarded benefits to the companies that finance entertainment productions in the state.

Engelhardt said in determining the two-year prison sentence, much less than time Smith could have gotten, he balanced Smith's cooperation with federal investigators after his guilty plea in the fall of 2007 against the damage he wrought by accepting cash bribes from a film producer in exchange for doling out too many lucrative state tax credits.

That cooperation led to others being charged in the case: Malcolm Petal, the co-founder and head of the New Orleans company LIFT Productions and other firms and William Bradley, a Hammond attorney. Both men also pleaded guilty to participating in a conspiracy to bribe a state official.

The bribes, worth $135,000, were channeled from Petal to Bradley, a former law-school friend of Smith, who then split the money with Smith. Engelhardt ordered Smith to pay a $67,5000 fine, saying he couldn't allow him to keep the ill-gotten gains.

"The sentence is fair and justified," Smith told the judge at the end of the proceedings. He was ordered to report to prison on August 31.

As the state's film commissioner, Smith had the authority to determine how many tax credits to award to productions filmed in Louisiana. Federal prosecutors have said he gave "way more" tax credits to Petal than he deserved based on how much money he actually spent.

The credits were valuable because upon receipt producers could sell them at a slight discount, meaning that they generated instant cash.

The focus of the investigation was $1.35 million in tax credits received by one of Petal's companies, Break Beat, for filming the 2003 Voodoo Music Festival.

The sentencing today brings the case to a close. Bradley was sentenced to 10 months in federal prison by U.S. District Judge Lance Africk earlier this month. Petal received the stiffest sentence, a five-year prison term also handed down by Africk.

Africk said at the time that he gave Petal the maximum sentence because his actions bolstered the state's reputation for rampant political corruption at a time when residents are striving to shed that image.

Former La. film official to be sentenced

From The Daily Advertiser
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal judge is set to sentence a former Louisiana film commissioner who pleaded guilty to taking bribe money to secure tax credits for a movie producer.

Mark S. Smith faces a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison when he is sentenced Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt.

Smith served as the state's film commissioner from 2003 to 2005. He pleaded guilty in 2007 to taking about $65,000 in bribes to help movie producer Malcolm Petal secure about $1.3 million in state tax credits for filming live music festivals.

Petal was sentenced in April to five years in prison for his role in the scheme. William Bradley, a lawyer who was the middleman for bribe payments to Smith, was sentenced earlier this month to 10 months in prison.

Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

From The Times-Picayune
Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

Jazz Fest producers are accepting applications for performers for the 2010 event, scheduled for April 23-May 2.

Upwards of 80 percent of the hundreds of acts featured each year at Jazz Fest are Louisiana-based. Bands interested in performing should submit a recording, bio, photo, press clippings, contact information and an email address.

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival presented by Shell
Attn: Music Production
336 Camp Street, Suite 250
New Orleans, LA, 70130.

Applications are available online at the Jazz Fest Web site.

Submission deadline is October 10.

Former Tulane University Historian Douglas Brinkley takes a long, fond look at Theodore Roosevelt

Historian Douglas Brinkley finally has a moment.

Just in from breakfast with C-SPAN founder Brian Lamb, he stops for an interview with his former hometown's newspaper the day before he makes an appearance with Diane Rehm on NPR. Earlier this month he wrote a cover story for Vanity Fair, a postcard from a weeklong cruise in the Caribbean with actor Johnny Depp. Last month there was dinner with President Barack Obama and fellow presidential historians Michael Beschloss, H.W. Brands, Robert Caro, Robert Dallek, Doris Kearns Goodwin, David Kennedy, Kenneth Mack and Garry Wills.

What: Historian Douglas Brinkley signs "The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America" (Harper, $34.99)
When: 1-3 p.m. Saturday
Where: Garden District Book Shop, 2727 Prytania

'Forest Gump' Author Winston Groom Highlights New Orleans Area Visits This Week

Winston Groom
What: The novelist and historian, author of 'Forest Gump,' 'Conversations With the Enemy' and, most recently, 'Vicksburg, 1863,' appears with artist William Dunlap and Ogden Museum of Art director J. Richard Gruber as part of the Southern Storytellers series.
When: Sunday, 2 p.m.
Where: Ogden Museum of Art. For information and to reserve a spot, contact Stephanie Spicer, 504.539.9618.

Jeff L. Rosenheim, curator of photographs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, presents a lecture, 'In the Spirit: The Achievement and Legacy of Michael P. Smith,' today, 6:30 p.m., the Historic New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St. Free, but seating is limited. Call 504.523.4662 for reservations.

Martha Hall Foose signs 'Screen Doors and Sweet Tea: Recipes and Tales From a Southern Cook,' Thursday, 6-8 p.m., during Ogden After Hours, featuring Larry Sieberth & Friends, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Book-signing is free concert is free to museum members, $10 general admission.

Bill Dixon signs 'Last Days of Last Island: The Hurricane of 1856, Louisiana's First Great Storm,' Friday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books, and again Saturday, 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble/Metairie.

Sherry Lee Alexander interviews Travis Bradberry, author of 'Emotional Intelligence 2.0,' Saturday, 8:30 a.m., on Writers' Forum, WRBH-FM radio. Program repeats Sunday at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 p.m.

Douglas Brinkley signs 'The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America,' Saturday, 1-3 p.m., at Garden District Book shop.

Poets Chris Champagne, Danny Kerwick, Martha McFerren and Laura Mattingly present a reading, Saturday, 2-3:30 p.m., Latter Library.

Poets Julie Kane ('Jazz Funeral') and Robin Kemp ('This Pagan Heaven') read from and sign their books, Sunday, 3 p.m., Maple Leaf Bar.

Robin Kemp reads from and signs 'This Pagan Heaven,' Monday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books.


7 Iconic Comic Foods in Honor of New York Comic Con (Slideshow) - Recipes

by Laura Maggi
Mark Smith, the former lead recruiter responsible for recruiting movie companies to make films in Louisiana, will serve a two-year prison term for accepting bribes in exchange for giving lucrative state tax credits to a film producer, a federal judge ruled today.

U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt told Smith that he believed he was "sincerely remorseful," but said that his actions had tarnished the fledgling movie industry. "We live with the damage today," the judge said, as he put the finishing touches on two-year investigation of how the state awarded benefits to the companies that finance entertainment productions in the state.

Engelhardt said in determining the two-year prison sentence, much less than time Smith could have gotten, he balanced Smith's cooperation with federal investigators after his guilty plea in the fall of 2007 against the damage he wrought by accepting cash bribes from a film producer in exchange for doling out too many lucrative state tax credits.

That cooperation led to others being charged in the case: Malcolm Petal, the co-founder and head of the New Orleans company LIFT Productions and other firms and William Bradley, a Hammond attorney. Both men also pleaded guilty to participating in a conspiracy to bribe a state official.

The bribes, worth $135,000, were channeled from Petal to Bradley, a former law-school friend of Smith, who then split the money with Smith. Engelhardt ordered Smith to pay a $67,5000 fine, saying he couldn't allow him to keep the ill-gotten gains.

"The sentence is fair and justified," Smith told the judge at the end of the proceedings. He was ordered to report to prison on August 31.

As the state's film commissioner, Smith had the authority to determine how many tax credits to award to productions filmed in Louisiana. Federal prosecutors have said he gave "way more" tax credits to Petal than he deserved based on how much money he actually spent.

The credits were valuable because upon receipt producers could sell them at a slight discount, meaning that they generated instant cash.

The focus of the investigation was $1.35 million in tax credits received by one of Petal's companies, Break Beat, for filming the 2003 Voodoo Music Festival.

The sentencing today brings the case to a close. Bradley was sentenced to 10 months in federal prison by U.S. District Judge Lance Africk earlier this month. Petal received the stiffest sentence, a five-year prison term also handed down by Africk.

Africk said at the time that he gave Petal the maximum sentence because his actions bolstered the state's reputation for rampant political corruption at a time when residents are striving to shed that image.

Former La. film official to be sentenced

From The Daily Advertiser
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal judge is set to sentence a former Louisiana film commissioner who pleaded guilty to taking bribe money to secure tax credits for a movie producer.

Mark S. Smith faces a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison when he is sentenced Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt.

Smith served as the state's film commissioner from 2003 to 2005. He pleaded guilty in 2007 to taking about $65,000 in bribes to help movie producer Malcolm Petal secure about $1.3 million in state tax credits for filming live music festivals.

Petal was sentenced in April to five years in prison for his role in the scheme. William Bradley, a lawyer who was the middleman for bribe payments to Smith, was sentenced earlier this month to 10 months in prison.

Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

From The Times-Picayune
Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

Jazz Fest producers are accepting applications for performers for the 2010 event, scheduled for April 23-May 2.

Upwards of 80 percent of the hundreds of acts featured each year at Jazz Fest are Louisiana-based. Bands interested in performing should submit a recording, bio, photo, press clippings, contact information and an email address.

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival presented by Shell
Attn: Music Production
336 Camp Street, Suite 250
New Orleans, LA, 70130.

Applications are available online at the Jazz Fest Web site.

Submission deadline is October 10.

Former Tulane University Historian Douglas Brinkley takes a long, fond look at Theodore Roosevelt

Historian Douglas Brinkley finally has a moment.

Just in from breakfast with C-SPAN founder Brian Lamb, he stops for an interview with his former hometown's newspaper the day before he makes an appearance with Diane Rehm on NPR. Earlier this month he wrote a cover story for Vanity Fair, a postcard from a weeklong cruise in the Caribbean with actor Johnny Depp. Last month there was dinner with President Barack Obama and fellow presidential historians Michael Beschloss, H.W. Brands, Robert Caro, Robert Dallek, Doris Kearns Goodwin, David Kennedy, Kenneth Mack and Garry Wills.

What: Historian Douglas Brinkley signs "The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America" (Harper, $34.99)
When: 1-3 p.m. Saturday
Where: Garden District Book Shop, 2727 Prytania

'Forest Gump' Author Winston Groom Highlights New Orleans Area Visits This Week

Winston Groom
What: The novelist and historian, author of 'Forest Gump,' 'Conversations With the Enemy' and, most recently, 'Vicksburg, 1863,' appears with artist William Dunlap and Ogden Museum of Art director J. Richard Gruber as part of the Southern Storytellers series.
When: Sunday, 2 p.m.
Where: Ogden Museum of Art. For information and to reserve a spot, contact Stephanie Spicer, 504.539.9618.

Jeff L. Rosenheim, curator of photographs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, presents a lecture, 'In the Spirit: The Achievement and Legacy of Michael P. Smith,' today, 6:30 p.m., the Historic New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St. Free, but seating is limited. Call 504.523.4662 for reservations.

Martha Hall Foose signs 'Screen Doors and Sweet Tea: Recipes and Tales From a Southern Cook,' Thursday, 6-8 p.m., during Ogden After Hours, featuring Larry Sieberth & Friends, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Book-signing is free concert is free to museum members, $10 general admission.

Bill Dixon signs 'Last Days of Last Island: The Hurricane of 1856, Louisiana's First Great Storm,' Friday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books, and again Saturday, 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble/Metairie.

Sherry Lee Alexander interviews Travis Bradberry, author of 'Emotional Intelligence 2.0,' Saturday, 8:30 a.m., on Writers' Forum, WRBH-FM radio. Program repeats Sunday at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 p.m.

Douglas Brinkley signs 'The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America,' Saturday, 1-3 p.m., at Garden District Book shop.

Poets Chris Champagne, Danny Kerwick, Martha McFerren and Laura Mattingly present a reading, Saturday, 2-3:30 p.m., Latter Library.

Poets Julie Kane ('Jazz Funeral') and Robin Kemp ('This Pagan Heaven') read from and sign their books, Sunday, 3 p.m., Maple Leaf Bar.

Robin Kemp reads from and signs 'This Pagan Heaven,' Monday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books.


7 Iconic Comic Foods in Honor of New York Comic Con (Slideshow) - Recipes

by Laura Maggi
Mark Smith, the former lead recruiter responsible for recruiting movie companies to make films in Louisiana, will serve a two-year prison term for accepting bribes in exchange for giving lucrative state tax credits to a film producer, a federal judge ruled today.

U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt told Smith that he believed he was "sincerely remorseful," but said that his actions had tarnished the fledgling movie industry. "We live with the damage today," the judge said, as he put the finishing touches on two-year investigation of how the state awarded benefits to the companies that finance entertainment productions in the state.

Engelhardt said in determining the two-year prison sentence, much less than time Smith could have gotten, he balanced Smith's cooperation with federal investigators after his guilty plea in the fall of 2007 against the damage he wrought by accepting cash bribes from a film producer in exchange for doling out too many lucrative state tax credits.

That cooperation led to others being charged in the case: Malcolm Petal, the co-founder and head of the New Orleans company LIFT Productions and other firms and William Bradley, a Hammond attorney. Both men also pleaded guilty to participating in a conspiracy to bribe a state official.

The bribes, worth $135,000, were channeled from Petal to Bradley, a former law-school friend of Smith, who then split the money with Smith. Engelhardt ordered Smith to pay a $67,5000 fine, saying he couldn't allow him to keep the ill-gotten gains.

"The sentence is fair and justified," Smith told the judge at the end of the proceedings. He was ordered to report to prison on August 31.

As the state's film commissioner, Smith had the authority to determine how many tax credits to award to productions filmed in Louisiana. Federal prosecutors have said he gave "way more" tax credits to Petal than he deserved based on how much money he actually spent.

The credits were valuable because upon receipt producers could sell them at a slight discount, meaning that they generated instant cash.

The focus of the investigation was $1.35 million in tax credits received by one of Petal's companies, Break Beat, for filming the 2003 Voodoo Music Festival.

The sentencing today brings the case to a close. Bradley was sentenced to 10 months in federal prison by U.S. District Judge Lance Africk earlier this month. Petal received the stiffest sentence, a five-year prison term also handed down by Africk.

Africk said at the time that he gave Petal the maximum sentence because his actions bolstered the state's reputation for rampant political corruption at a time when residents are striving to shed that image.

Former La. film official to be sentenced

From The Daily Advertiser
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal judge is set to sentence a former Louisiana film commissioner who pleaded guilty to taking bribe money to secure tax credits for a movie producer.

Mark S. Smith faces a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison when he is sentenced Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt.

Smith served as the state's film commissioner from 2003 to 2005. He pleaded guilty in 2007 to taking about $65,000 in bribes to help movie producer Malcolm Petal secure about $1.3 million in state tax credits for filming live music festivals.

Petal was sentenced in April to five years in prison for his role in the scheme. William Bradley, a lawyer who was the middleman for bribe payments to Smith, was sentenced earlier this month to 10 months in prison.

Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

From The Times-Picayune
Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

Jazz Fest producers are accepting applications for performers for the 2010 event, scheduled for April 23-May 2.

Upwards of 80 percent of the hundreds of acts featured each year at Jazz Fest are Louisiana-based. Bands interested in performing should submit a recording, bio, photo, press clippings, contact information and an email address.

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival presented by Shell
Attn: Music Production
336 Camp Street, Suite 250
New Orleans, LA, 70130.

Applications are available online at the Jazz Fest Web site.

Submission deadline is October 10.

Former Tulane University Historian Douglas Brinkley takes a long, fond look at Theodore Roosevelt

Historian Douglas Brinkley finally has a moment.

Just in from breakfast with C-SPAN founder Brian Lamb, he stops for an interview with his former hometown's newspaper the day before he makes an appearance with Diane Rehm on NPR. Earlier this month he wrote a cover story for Vanity Fair, a postcard from a weeklong cruise in the Caribbean with actor Johnny Depp. Last month there was dinner with President Barack Obama and fellow presidential historians Michael Beschloss, H.W. Brands, Robert Caro, Robert Dallek, Doris Kearns Goodwin, David Kennedy, Kenneth Mack and Garry Wills.

What: Historian Douglas Brinkley signs "The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America" (Harper, $34.99)
When: 1-3 p.m. Saturday
Where: Garden District Book Shop, 2727 Prytania

'Forest Gump' Author Winston Groom Highlights New Orleans Area Visits This Week

Winston Groom
What: The novelist and historian, author of 'Forest Gump,' 'Conversations With the Enemy' and, most recently, 'Vicksburg, 1863,' appears with artist William Dunlap and Ogden Museum of Art director J. Richard Gruber as part of the Southern Storytellers series.
When: Sunday, 2 p.m.
Where: Ogden Museum of Art. For information and to reserve a spot, contact Stephanie Spicer, 504.539.9618.

Jeff L. Rosenheim, curator of photographs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, presents a lecture, 'In the Spirit: The Achievement and Legacy of Michael P. Smith,' today, 6:30 p.m., the Historic New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St. Free, but seating is limited. Call 504.523.4662 for reservations.

Martha Hall Foose signs 'Screen Doors and Sweet Tea: Recipes and Tales From a Southern Cook,' Thursday, 6-8 p.m., during Ogden After Hours, featuring Larry Sieberth & Friends, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Book-signing is free concert is free to museum members, $10 general admission.

Bill Dixon signs 'Last Days of Last Island: The Hurricane of 1856, Louisiana's First Great Storm,' Friday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books, and again Saturday, 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble/Metairie.

Sherry Lee Alexander interviews Travis Bradberry, author of 'Emotional Intelligence 2.0,' Saturday, 8:30 a.m., on Writers' Forum, WRBH-FM radio. Program repeats Sunday at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 p.m.

Douglas Brinkley signs 'The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America,' Saturday, 1-3 p.m., at Garden District Book shop.

Poets Chris Champagne, Danny Kerwick, Martha McFerren and Laura Mattingly present a reading, Saturday, 2-3:30 p.m., Latter Library.

Poets Julie Kane ('Jazz Funeral') and Robin Kemp ('This Pagan Heaven') read from and sign their books, Sunday, 3 p.m., Maple Leaf Bar.

Robin Kemp reads from and signs 'This Pagan Heaven,' Monday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books.


7 Iconic Comic Foods in Honor of New York Comic Con (Slideshow) - Recipes

by Laura Maggi
Mark Smith, the former lead recruiter responsible for recruiting movie companies to make films in Louisiana, will serve a two-year prison term for accepting bribes in exchange for giving lucrative state tax credits to a film producer, a federal judge ruled today.

U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt told Smith that he believed he was "sincerely remorseful," but said that his actions had tarnished the fledgling movie industry. "We live with the damage today," the judge said, as he put the finishing touches on two-year investigation of how the state awarded benefits to the companies that finance entertainment productions in the state.

Engelhardt said in determining the two-year prison sentence, much less than time Smith could have gotten, he balanced Smith's cooperation with federal investigators after his guilty plea in the fall of 2007 against the damage he wrought by accepting cash bribes from a film producer in exchange for doling out too many lucrative state tax credits.

That cooperation led to others being charged in the case: Malcolm Petal, the co-founder and head of the New Orleans company LIFT Productions and other firms and William Bradley, a Hammond attorney. Both men also pleaded guilty to participating in a conspiracy to bribe a state official.

The bribes, worth $135,000, were channeled from Petal to Bradley, a former law-school friend of Smith, who then split the money with Smith. Engelhardt ordered Smith to pay a $67,5000 fine, saying he couldn't allow him to keep the ill-gotten gains.

"The sentence is fair and justified," Smith told the judge at the end of the proceedings. He was ordered to report to prison on August 31.

As the state's film commissioner, Smith had the authority to determine how many tax credits to award to productions filmed in Louisiana. Federal prosecutors have said he gave "way more" tax credits to Petal than he deserved based on how much money he actually spent.

The credits were valuable because upon receipt producers could sell them at a slight discount, meaning that they generated instant cash.

The focus of the investigation was $1.35 million in tax credits received by one of Petal's companies, Break Beat, for filming the 2003 Voodoo Music Festival.

The sentencing today brings the case to a close. Bradley was sentenced to 10 months in federal prison by U.S. District Judge Lance Africk earlier this month. Petal received the stiffest sentence, a five-year prison term also handed down by Africk.

Africk said at the time that he gave Petal the maximum sentence because his actions bolstered the state's reputation for rampant political corruption at a time when residents are striving to shed that image.

Former La. film official to be sentenced

From The Daily Advertiser
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal judge is set to sentence a former Louisiana film commissioner who pleaded guilty to taking bribe money to secure tax credits for a movie producer.

Mark S. Smith faces a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison when he is sentenced Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt.

Smith served as the state's film commissioner from 2003 to 2005. He pleaded guilty in 2007 to taking about $65,000 in bribes to help movie producer Malcolm Petal secure about $1.3 million in state tax credits for filming live music festivals.

Petal was sentenced in April to five years in prison for his role in the scheme. William Bradley, a lawyer who was the middleman for bribe payments to Smith, was sentenced earlier this month to 10 months in prison.

Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

From The Times-Picayune
Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

Jazz Fest producers are accepting applications for performers for the 2010 event, scheduled for April 23-May 2.

Upwards of 80 percent of the hundreds of acts featured each year at Jazz Fest are Louisiana-based. Bands interested in performing should submit a recording, bio, photo, press clippings, contact information and an email address.

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival presented by Shell
Attn: Music Production
336 Camp Street, Suite 250
New Orleans, LA, 70130.

Applications are available online at the Jazz Fest Web site.

Submission deadline is October 10.

Former Tulane University Historian Douglas Brinkley takes a long, fond look at Theodore Roosevelt

Historian Douglas Brinkley finally has a moment.

Just in from breakfast with C-SPAN founder Brian Lamb, he stops for an interview with his former hometown's newspaper the day before he makes an appearance with Diane Rehm on NPR. Earlier this month he wrote a cover story for Vanity Fair, a postcard from a weeklong cruise in the Caribbean with actor Johnny Depp. Last month there was dinner with President Barack Obama and fellow presidential historians Michael Beschloss, H.W. Brands, Robert Caro, Robert Dallek, Doris Kearns Goodwin, David Kennedy, Kenneth Mack and Garry Wills.

What: Historian Douglas Brinkley signs "The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America" (Harper, $34.99)
When: 1-3 p.m. Saturday
Where: Garden District Book Shop, 2727 Prytania

'Forest Gump' Author Winston Groom Highlights New Orleans Area Visits This Week

Winston Groom
What: The novelist and historian, author of 'Forest Gump,' 'Conversations With the Enemy' and, most recently, 'Vicksburg, 1863,' appears with artist William Dunlap and Ogden Museum of Art director J. Richard Gruber as part of the Southern Storytellers series.
When: Sunday, 2 p.m.
Where: Ogden Museum of Art. For information and to reserve a spot, contact Stephanie Spicer, 504.539.9618.

Jeff L. Rosenheim, curator of photographs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, presents a lecture, 'In the Spirit: The Achievement and Legacy of Michael P. Smith,' today, 6:30 p.m., the Historic New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St. Free, but seating is limited. Call 504.523.4662 for reservations.

Martha Hall Foose signs 'Screen Doors and Sweet Tea: Recipes and Tales From a Southern Cook,' Thursday, 6-8 p.m., during Ogden After Hours, featuring Larry Sieberth & Friends, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Book-signing is free concert is free to museum members, $10 general admission.

Bill Dixon signs 'Last Days of Last Island: The Hurricane of 1856, Louisiana's First Great Storm,' Friday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books, and again Saturday, 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble/Metairie.

Sherry Lee Alexander interviews Travis Bradberry, author of 'Emotional Intelligence 2.0,' Saturday, 8:30 a.m., on Writers' Forum, WRBH-FM radio. Program repeats Sunday at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 p.m.

Douglas Brinkley signs 'The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America,' Saturday, 1-3 p.m., at Garden District Book shop.

Poets Chris Champagne, Danny Kerwick, Martha McFerren and Laura Mattingly present a reading, Saturday, 2-3:30 p.m., Latter Library.

Poets Julie Kane ('Jazz Funeral') and Robin Kemp ('This Pagan Heaven') read from and sign their books, Sunday, 3 p.m., Maple Leaf Bar.

Robin Kemp reads from and signs 'This Pagan Heaven,' Monday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books.


7 Iconic Comic Foods in Honor of New York Comic Con (Slideshow) - Recipes

by Laura Maggi
Mark Smith, the former lead recruiter responsible for recruiting movie companies to make films in Louisiana, will serve a two-year prison term for accepting bribes in exchange for giving lucrative state tax credits to a film producer, a federal judge ruled today.

U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt told Smith that he believed he was "sincerely remorseful," but said that his actions had tarnished the fledgling movie industry. "We live with the damage today," the judge said, as he put the finishing touches on two-year investigation of how the state awarded benefits to the companies that finance entertainment productions in the state.

Engelhardt said in determining the two-year prison sentence, much less than time Smith could have gotten, he balanced Smith's cooperation with federal investigators after his guilty plea in the fall of 2007 against the damage he wrought by accepting cash bribes from a film producer in exchange for doling out too many lucrative state tax credits.

That cooperation led to others being charged in the case: Malcolm Petal, the co-founder and head of the New Orleans company LIFT Productions and other firms and William Bradley, a Hammond attorney. Both men also pleaded guilty to participating in a conspiracy to bribe a state official.

The bribes, worth $135,000, were channeled from Petal to Bradley, a former law-school friend of Smith, who then split the money with Smith. Engelhardt ordered Smith to pay a $67,5000 fine, saying he couldn't allow him to keep the ill-gotten gains.

"The sentence is fair and justified," Smith told the judge at the end of the proceedings. He was ordered to report to prison on August 31.

As the state's film commissioner, Smith had the authority to determine how many tax credits to award to productions filmed in Louisiana. Federal prosecutors have said he gave "way more" tax credits to Petal than he deserved based on how much money he actually spent.

The credits were valuable because upon receipt producers could sell them at a slight discount, meaning that they generated instant cash.

The focus of the investigation was $1.35 million in tax credits received by one of Petal's companies, Break Beat, for filming the 2003 Voodoo Music Festival.

The sentencing today brings the case to a close. Bradley was sentenced to 10 months in federal prison by U.S. District Judge Lance Africk earlier this month. Petal received the stiffest sentence, a five-year prison term also handed down by Africk.

Africk said at the time that he gave Petal the maximum sentence because his actions bolstered the state's reputation for rampant political corruption at a time when residents are striving to shed that image.

Former La. film official to be sentenced

From The Daily Advertiser
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal judge is set to sentence a former Louisiana film commissioner who pleaded guilty to taking bribe money to secure tax credits for a movie producer.

Mark S. Smith faces a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison when he is sentenced Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt.

Smith served as the state's film commissioner from 2003 to 2005. He pleaded guilty in 2007 to taking about $65,000 in bribes to help movie producer Malcolm Petal secure about $1.3 million in state tax credits for filming live music festivals.

Petal was sentenced in April to five years in prison for his role in the scheme. William Bradley, a lawyer who was the middleman for bribe payments to Smith, was sentenced earlier this month to 10 months in prison.

Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

From The Times-Picayune
Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

Jazz Fest producers are accepting applications for performers for the 2010 event, scheduled for April 23-May 2.

Upwards of 80 percent of the hundreds of acts featured each year at Jazz Fest are Louisiana-based. Bands interested in performing should submit a recording, bio, photo, press clippings, contact information and an email address.

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival presented by Shell
Attn: Music Production
336 Camp Street, Suite 250
New Orleans, LA, 70130.

Applications are available online at the Jazz Fest Web site.

Submission deadline is October 10.

Former Tulane University Historian Douglas Brinkley takes a long, fond look at Theodore Roosevelt

Historian Douglas Brinkley finally has a moment.

Just in from breakfast with C-SPAN founder Brian Lamb, he stops for an interview with his former hometown's newspaper the day before he makes an appearance with Diane Rehm on NPR. Earlier this month he wrote a cover story for Vanity Fair, a postcard from a weeklong cruise in the Caribbean with actor Johnny Depp. Last month there was dinner with President Barack Obama and fellow presidential historians Michael Beschloss, H.W. Brands, Robert Caro, Robert Dallek, Doris Kearns Goodwin, David Kennedy, Kenneth Mack and Garry Wills.

What: Historian Douglas Brinkley signs "The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America" (Harper, $34.99)
When: 1-3 p.m. Saturday
Where: Garden District Book Shop, 2727 Prytania

'Forest Gump' Author Winston Groom Highlights New Orleans Area Visits This Week

Winston Groom
What: The novelist and historian, author of 'Forest Gump,' 'Conversations With the Enemy' and, most recently, 'Vicksburg, 1863,' appears with artist William Dunlap and Ogden Museum of Art director J. Richard Gruber as part of the Southern Storytellers series.
When: Sunday, 2 p.m.
Where: Ogden Museum of Art. For information and to reserve a spot, contact Stephanie Spicer, 504.539.9618.

Jeff L. Rosenheim, curator of photographs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, presents a lecture, 'In the Spirit: The Achievement and Legacy of Michael P. Smith,' today, 6:30 p.m., the Historic New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St. Free, but seating is limited. Call 504.523.4662 for reservations.

Martha Hall Foose signs 'Screen Doors and Sweet Tea: Recipes and Tales From a Southern Cook,' Thursday, 6-8 p.m., during Ogden After Hours, featuring Larry Sieberth & Friends, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Book-signing is free concert is free to museum members, $10 general admission.

Bill Dixon signs 'Last Days of Last Island: The Hurricane of 1856, Louisiana's First Great Storm,' Friday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books, and again Saturday, 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble/Metairie.

Sherry Lee Alexander interviews Travis Bradberry, author of 'Emotional Intelligence 2.0,' Saturday, 8:30 a.m., on Writers' Forum, WRBH-FM radio. Program repeats Sunday at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 p.m.

Douglas Brinkley signs 'The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America,' Saturday, 1-3 p.m., at Garden District Book shop.

Poets Chris Champagne, Danny Kerwick, Martha McFerren and Laura Mattingly present a reading, Saturday, 2-3:30 p.m., Latter Library.

Poets Julie Kane ('Jazz Funeral') and Robin Kemp ('This Pagan Heaven') read from and sign their books, Sunday, 3 p.m., Maple Leaf Bar.

Robin Kemp reads from and signs 'This Pagan Heaven,' Monday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books.


7 Iconic Comic Foods in Honor of New York Comic Con (Slideshow) - Recipes

by Laura Maggi
Mark Smith, the former lead recruiter responsible for recruiting movie companies to make films in Louisiana, will serve a two-year prison term for accepting bribes in exchange for giving lucrative state tax credits to a film producer, a federal judge ruled today.

U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt told Smith that he believed he was "sincerely remorseful," but said that his actions had tarnished the fledgling movie industry. "We live with the damage today," the judge said, as he put the finishing touches on two-year investigation of how the state awarded benefits to the companies that finance entertainment productions in the state.

Engelhardt said in determining the two-year prison sentence, much less than time Smith could have gotten, he balanced Smith's cooperation with federal investigators after his guilty plea in the fall of 2007 against the damage he wrought by accepting cash bribes from a film producer in exchange for doling out too many lucrative state tax credits.

That cooperation led to others being charged in the case: Malcolm Petal, the co-founder and head of the New Orleans company LIFT Productions and other firms and William Bradley, a Hammond attorney. Both men also pleaded guilty to participating in a conspiracy to bribe a state official.

The bribes, worth $135,000, were channeled from Petal to Bradley, a former law-school friend of Smith, who then split the money with Smith. Engelhardt ordered Smith to pay a $67,5000 fine, saying he couldn't allow him to keep the ill-gotten gains.

"The sentence is fair and justified," Smith told the judge at the end of the proceedings. He was ordered to report to prison on August 31.

As the state's film commissioner, Smith had the authority to determine how many tax credits to award to productions filmed in Louisiana. Federal prosecutors have said he gave "way more" tax credits to Petal than he deserved based on how much money he actually spent.

The credits were valuable because upon receipt producers could sell them at a slight discount, meaning that they generated instant cash.

The focus of the investigation was $1.35 million in tax credits received by one of Petal's companies, Break Beat, for filming the 2003 Voodoo Music Festival.

The sentencing today brings the case to a close. Bradley was sentenced to 10 months in federal prison by U.S. District Judge Lance Africk earlier this month. Petal received the stiffest sentence, a five-year prison term also handed down by Africk.

Africk said at the time that he gave Petal the maximum sentence because his actions bolstered the state's reputation for rampant political corruption at a time when residents are striving to shed that image.

Former La. film official to be sentenced

From The Daily Advertiser
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal judge is set to sentence a former Louisiana film commissioner who pleaded guilty to taking bribe money to secure tax credits for a movie producer.

Mark S. Smith faces a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison when he is sentenced Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt.

Smith served as the state's film commissioner from 2003 to 2005. He pleaded guilty in 2007 to taking about $65,000 in bribes to help movie producer Malcolm Petal secure about $1.3 million in state tax credits for filming live music festivals.

Petal was sentenced in April to five years in prison for his role in the scheme. William Bradley, a lawyer who was the middleman for bribe payments to Smith, was sentenced earlier this month to 10 months in prison.

Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

From The Times-Picayune
Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

Jazz Fest producers are accepting applications for performers for the 2010 event, scheduled for April 23-May 2.

Upwards of 80 percent of the hundreds of acts featured each year at Jazz Fest are Louisiana-based. Bands interested in performing should submit a recording, bio, photo, press clippings, contact information and an email address.

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival presented by Shell
Attn: Music Production
336 Camp Street, Suite 250
New Orleans, LA, 70130.

Applications are available online at the Jazz Fest Web site.

Submission deadline is October 10.

Former Tulane University Historian Douglas Brinkley takes a long, fond look at Theodore Roosevelt

Historian Douglas Brinkley finally has a moment.

Just in from breakfast with C-SPAN founder Brian Lamb, he stops for an interview with his former hometown's newspaper the day before he makes an appearance with Diane Rehm on NPR. Earlier this month he wrote a cover story for Vanity Fair, a postcard from a weeklong cruise in the Caribbean with actor Johnny Depp. Last month there was dinner with President Barack Obama and fellow presidential historians Michael Beschloss, H.W. Brands, Robert Caro, Robert Dallek, Doris Kearns Goodwin, David Kennedy, Kenneth Mack and Garry Wills.

What: Historian Douglas Brinkley signs "The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America" (Harper, $34.99)
When: 1-3 p.m. Saturday
Where: Garden District Book Shop, 2727 Prytania

'Forest Gump' Author Winston Groom Highlights New Orleans Area Visits This Week

Winston Groom
What: The novelist and historian, author of 'Forest Gump,' 'Conversations With the Enemy' and, most recently, 'Vicksburg, 1863,' appears with artist William Dunlap and Ogden Museum of Art director J. Richard Gruber as part of the Southern Storytellers series.
When: Sunday, 2 p.m.
Where: Ogden Museum of Art. For information and to reserve a spot, contact Stephanie Spicer, 504.539.9618.

Jeff L. Rosenheim, curator of photographs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, presents a lecture, 'In the Spirit: The Achievement and Legacy of Michael P. Smith,' today, 6:30 p.m., the Historic New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St. Free, but seating is limited. Call 504.523.4662 for reservations.

Martha Hall Foose signs 'Screen Doors and Sweet Tea: Recipes and Tales From a Southern Cook,' Thursday, 6-8 p.m., during Ogden After Hours, featuring Larry Sieberth & Friends, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Book-signing is free concert is free to museum members, $10 general admission.

Bill Dixon signs 'Last Days of Last Island: The Hurricane of 1856, Louisiana's First Great Storm,' Friday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books, and again Saturday, 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble/Metairie.

Sherry Lee Alexander interviews Travis Bradberry, author of 'Emotional Intelligence 2.0,' Saturday, 8:30 a.m., on Writers' Forum, WRBH-FM radio. Program repeats Sunday at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 p.m.

Douglas Brinkley signs 'The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America,' Saturday, 1-3 p.m., at Garden District Book shop.

Poets Chris Champagne, Danny Kerwick, Martha McFerren and Laura Mattingly present a reading, Saturday, 2-3:30 p.m., Latter Library.

Poets Julie Kane ('Jazz Funeral') and Robin Kemp ('This Pagan Heaven') read from and sign their books, Sunday, 3 p.m., Maple Leaf Bar.

Robin Kemp reads from and signs 'This Pagan Heaven,' Monday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books.


7 Iconic Comic Foods in Honor of New York Comic Con (Slideshow) - Recipes

by Laura Maggi
Mark Smith, the former lead recruiter responsible for recruiting movie companies to make films in Louisiana, will serve a two-year prison term for accepting bribes in exchange for giving lucrative state tax credits to a film producer, a federal judge ruled today.

U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt told Smith that he believed he was "sincerely remorseful," but said that his actions had tarnished the fledgling movie industry. "We live with the damage today," the judge said, as he put the finishing touches on two-year investigation of how the state awarded benefits to the companies that finance entertainment productions in the state.

Engelhardt said in determining the two-year prison sentence, much less than time Smith could have gotten, he balanced Smith's cooperation with federal investigators after his guilty plea in the fall of 2007 against the damage he wrought by accepting cash bribes from a film producer in exchange for doling out too many lucrative state tax credits.

That cooperation led to others being charged in the case: Malcolm Petal, the co-founder and head of the New Orleans company LIFT Productions and other firms and William Bradley, a Hammond attorney. Both men also pleaded guilty to participating in a conspiracy to bribe a state official.

The bribes, worth $135,000, were channeled from Petal to Bradley, a former law-school friend of Smith, who then split the money with Smith. Engelhardt ordered Smith to pay a $67,5000 fine, saying he couldn't allow him to keep the ill-gotten gains.

"The sentence is fair and justified," Smith told the judge at the end of the proceedings. He was ordered to report to prison on August 31.

As the state's film commissioner, Smith had the authority to determine how many tax credits to award to productions filmed in Louisiana. Federal prosecutors have said he gave "way more" tax credits to Petal than he deserved based on how much money he actually spent.

The credits were valuable because upon receipt producers could sell them at a slight discount, meaning that they generated instant cash.

The focus of the investigation was $1.35 million in tax credits received by one of Petal's companies, Break Beat, for filming the 2003 Voodoo Music Festival.

The sentencing today brings the case to a close. Bradley was sentenced to 10 months in federal prison by U.S. District Judge Lance Africk earlier this month. Petal received the stiffest sentence, a five-year prison term also handed down by Africk.

Africk said at the time that he gave Petal the maximum sentence because his actions bolstered the state's reputation for rampant political corruption at a time when residents are striving to shed that image.

Former La. film official to be sentenced

From The Daily Advertiser
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal judge is set to sentence a former Louisiana film commissioner who pleaded guilty to taking bribe money to secure tax credits for a movie producer.

Mark S. Smith faces a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison when he is sentenced Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt.

Smith served as the state's film commissioner from 2003 to 2005. He pleaded guilty in 2007 to taking about $65,000 in bribes to help movie producer Malcolm Petal secure about $1.3 million in state tax credits for filming live music festivals.

Petal was sentenced in April to five years in prison for his role in the scheme. William Bradley, a lawyer who was the middleman for bribe payments to Smith, was sentenced earlier this month to 10 months in prison.

Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

From The Times-Picayune
Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

Jazz Fest producers are accepting applications for performers for the 2010 event, scheduled for April 23-May 2.

Upwards of 80 percent of the hundreds of acts featured each year at Jazz Fest are Louisiana-based. Bands interested in performing should submit a recording, bio, photo, press clippings, contact information and an email address.

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival presented by Shell
Attn: Music Production
336 Camp Street, Suite 250
New Orleans, LA, 70130.

Applications are available online at the Jazz Fest Web site.

Submission deadline is October 10.

Former Tulane University Historian Douglas Brinkley takes a long, fond look at Theodore Roosevelt

Historian Douglas Brinkley finally has a moment.

Just in from breakfast with C-SPAN founder Brian Lamb, he stops for an interview with his former hometown's newspaper the day before he makes an appearance with Diane Rehm on NPR. Earlier this month he wrote a cover story for Vanity Fair, a postcard from a weeklong cruise in the Caribbean with actor Johnny Depp. Last month there was dinner with President Barack Obama and fellow presidential historians Michael Beschloss, H.W. Brands, Robert Caro, Robert Dallek, Doris Kearns Goodwin, David Kennedy, Kenneth Mack and Garry Wills.

What: Historian Douglas Brinkley signs "The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America" (Harper, $34.99)
When: 1-3 p.m. Saturday
Where: Garden District Book Shop, 2727 Prytania

'Forest Gump' Author Winston Groom Highlights New Orleans Area Visits This Week

Winston Groom
What: The novelist and historian, author of 'Forest Gump,' 'Conversations With the Enemy' and, most recently, 'Vicksburg, 1863,' appears with artist William Dunlap and Ogden Museum of Art director J. Richard Gruber as part of the Southern Storytellers series.
When: Sunday, 2 p.m.
Where: Ogden Museum of Art. For information and to reserve a spot, contact Stephanie Spicer, 504.539.9618.

Jeff L. Rosenheim, curator of photographs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, presents a lecture, 'In the Spirit: The Achievement and Legacy of Michael P. Smith,' today, 6:30 p.m., the Historic New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St. Free, but seating is limited. Call 504.523.4662 for reservations.

Martha Hall Foose signs 'Screen Doors and Sweet Tea: Recipes and Tales From a Southern Cook,' Thursday, 6-8 p.m., during Ogden After Hours, featuring Larry Sieberth & Friends, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Book-signing is free concert is free to museum members, $10 general admission.

Bill Dixon signs 'Last Days of Last Island: The Hurricane of 1856, Louisiana's First Great Storm,' Friday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books, and again Saturday, 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble/Metairie.

Sherry Lee Alexander interviews Travis Bradberry, author of 'Emotional Intelligence 2.0,' Saturday, 8:30 a.m., on Writers' Forum, WRBH-FM radio. Program repeats Sunday at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 p.m.

Douglas Brinkley signs 'The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America,' Saturday, 1-3 p.m., at Garden District Book shop.

Poets Chris Champagne, Danny Kerwick, Martha McFerren and Laura Mattingly present a reading, Saturday, 2-3:30 p.m., Latter Library.

Poets Julie Kane ('Jazz Funeral') and Robin Kemp ('This Pagan Heaven') read from and sign their books, Sunday, 3 p.m., Maple Leaf Bar.

Robin Kemp reads from and signs 'This Pagan Heaven,' Monday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books.


7 Iconic Comic Foods in Honor of New York Comic Con (Slideshow) - Recipes

by Laura Maggi
Mark Smith, the former lead recruiter responsible for recruiting movie companies to make films in Louisiana, will serve a two-year prison term for accepting bribes in exchange for giving lucrative state tax credits to a film producer, a federal judge ruled today.

U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt told Smith that he believed he was "sincerely remorseful," but said that his actions had tarnished the fledgling movie industry. "We live with the damage today," the judge said, as he put the finishing touches on two-year investigation of how the state awarded benefits to the companies that finance entertainment productions in the state.

Engelhardt said in determining the two-year prison sentence, much less than time Smith could have gotten, he balanced Smith's cooperation with federal investigators after his guilty plea in the fall of 2007 against the damage he wrought by accepting cash bribes from a film producer in exchange for doling out too many lucrative state tax credits.

That cooperation led to others being charged in the case: Malcolm Petal, the co-founder and head of the New Orleans company LIFT Productions and other firms and William Bradley, a Hammond attorney. Both men also pleaded guilty to participating in a conspiracy to bribe a state official.

The bribes, worth $135,000, were channeled from Petal to Bradley, a former law-school friend of Smith, who then split the money with Smith. Engelhardt ordered Smith to pay a $67,5000 fine, saying he couldn't allow him to keep the ill-gotten gains.

"The sentence is fair and justified," Smith told the judge at the end of the proceedings. He was ordered to report to prison on August 31.

As the state's film commissioner, Smith had the authority to determine how many tax credits to award to productions filmed in Louisiana. Federal prosecutors have said he gave "way more" tax credits to Petal than he deserved based on how much money he actually spent.

The credits were valuable because upon receipt producers could sell them at a slight discount, meaning that they generated instant cash.

The focus of the investigation was $1.35 million in tax credits received by one of Petal's companies, Break Beat, for filming the 2003 Voodoo Music Festival.

The sentencing today brings the case to a close. Bradley was sentenced to 10 months in federal prison by U.S. District Judge Lance Africk earlier this month. Petal received the stiffest sentence, a five-year prison term also handed down by Africk.

Africk said at the time that he gave Petal the maximum sentence because his actions bolstered the state's reputation for rampant political corruption at a time when residents are striving to shed that image.

Former La. film official to be sentenced

From The Daily Advertiser
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal judge is set to sentence a former Louisiana film commissioner who pleaded guilty to taking bribe money to secure tax credits for a movie producer.

Mark S. Smith faces a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison when he is sentenced Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt.

Smith served as the state's film commissioner from 2003 to 2005. He pleaded guilty in 2007 to taking about $65,000 in bribes to help movie producer Malcolm Petal secure about $1.3 million in state tax credits for filming live music festivals.

Petal was sentenced in April to five years in prison for his role in the scheme. William Bradley, a lawyer who was the middleman for bribe payments to Smith, was sentenced earlier this month to 10 months in prison.

Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

From The Times-Picayune
Jazz Fest accepting band applications for 2010

Jazz Fest producers are accepting applications for performers for the 2010 event, scheduled for April 23-May 2.

Upwards of 80 percent of the hundreds of acts featured each year at Jazz Fest are Louisiana-based. Bands interested in performing should submit a recording, bio, photo, press clippings, contact information and an email address.

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival presented by Shell
Attn: Music Production
336 Camp Street, Suite 250
New Orleans, LA, 70130.

Applications are available online at the Jazz Fest Web site.

Submission deadline is October 10.

Former Tulane University Historian Douglas Brinkley takes a long, fond look at Theodore Roosevelt

Historian Douglas Brinkley finally has a moment.

Just in from breakfast with C-SPAN founder Brian Lamb, he stops for an interview with his former hometown's newspaper the day before he makes an appearance with Diane Rehm on NPR. Earlier this month he wrote a cover story for Vanity Fair, a postcard from a weeklong cruise in the Caribbean with actor Johnny Depp. Last month there was dinner with President Barack Obama and fellow presidential historians Michael Beschloss, H.W. Brands, Robert Caro, Robert Dallek, Doris Kearns Goodwin, David Kennedy, Kenneth Mack and Garry Wills.

What: Historian Douglas Brinkley signs "The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America" (Harper, $34.99)
When: 1-3 p.m. Saturday
Where: Garden District Book Shop, 2727 Prytania

'Forest Gump' Author Winston Groom Highlights New Orleans Area Visits This Week

Winston Groom
What: The novelist and historian, author of 'Forest Gump,' 'Conversations With the Enemy' and, most recently, 'Vicksburg, 1863,' appears with artist William Dunlap and Ogden Museum of Art director J. Richard Gruber as part of the Southern Storytellers series.
When: Sunday, 2 p.m.
Where: Ogden Museum of Art. For information and to reserve a spot, contact Stephanie Spicer, 504.539.9618.

Jeff L. Rosenheim, curator of photographs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, presents a lecture, 'In the Spirit: The Achievement and Legacy of Michael P. Smith,' today, 6:30 p.m., the Historic New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St. Free, but seating is limited. Call 504.523.4662 for reservations.

Martha Hall Foose signs 'Screen Doors and Sweet Tea: Recipes and Tales From a Southern Cook,' Thursday, 6-8 p.m., during Ogden After Hours, featuring Larry Sieberth & Friends, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Book-signing is free concert is free to museum members, $10 general admission.

Bill Dixon signs 'Last Days of Last Island: The Hurricane of 1856, Louisiana's First Great Storm,' Friday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books, and again Saturday, 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble/Metairie.

Sherry Lee Alexander interviews Travis Bradberry, author of 'Emotional Intelligence 2.0,' Saturday, 8:30 a.m., on Writers' Forum, WRBH-FM radio. Program repeats Sunday at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 p.m.

Douglas Brinkley signs 'The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America,' Saturday, 1-3 p.m., at Garden District Book shop.

Poets Chris Champagne, Danny Kerwick, Martha McFerren and Laura Mattingly present a reading, Saturday, 2-3:30 p.m., Latter Library.

Poets Julie Kane ('Jazz Funeral') and Robin Kemp ('This Pagan Heaven') read from and sign their books, Sunday, 3 p.m., Maple Leaf Bar.

Robin Kemp reads from and signs 'This Pagan Heaven,' Monday, 6 p.m., Octavia Books.



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