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The Most Iconic Breakfast Foods in America

The Most Iconic Breakfast Foods in America


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The most famous parts of the most important meal of the day

It’s important to do breakfast right, and that's pretty easy with the number of American favorites so good that they can honestly be enjoyed any time of day. Reflecting a history of innovation, local culinary traditions and immigrant influences, these breakfast foods represent the many ways in which Americans start their morning.

Biscuits and gravy

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A Southern dish anyone would love, biscuits and gravy consists of delicious fluffy biscuits that are covered in gravy. The gravy is often made with white flour, milk and cooked pork sausage drippings, with bits of sausage, ground beef or other meat often added in. It’s the ultimate breakfast comfort dish. Looking to kick it up a notch? Try this recipe for spicy biscuits and gravy.

Hash browns

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You know them and you love them, but did you know hash browns originated in New York City restaurants in the late 19th century? This tried-and-true side continues to be popular at diners and fast food chains throughout the country. Hash browns are made by cutting, dicing, ricing or shredding potatoes and then pan-frying them, sometimes even adding chopped or diced onions. Here's how to make your own restaurant-style hashbrown casserole.

Eggs Benedict

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Eggs Benedict is another 19th-century New York City creation and a popular brunch food to this day. Two halves of an English muffin are topped with Canadian bacon, ham or smoked salmon, among other variations. The star of any eggs Benedict is a poached egg on each English muffin, which is then drizzled with hollandaise sauce. You can even make the dish with lobster.

Coffee cake

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Breakfast burrito

Originating in New Mexico but now spread throughout the country, a breakfast burrito isn’t stuffed with ground beef and rice. Instead, it features some combination of scrambled eggs, potatoes, chorizo, bacon, cheese, peppers, onions, salsa and sour cream. The perfect street food, breakfast burritos have gotten so popular that they’ve even appeared on the menus of fast food chains such as McDonald’s and Taco Bell. Here are some scrumptious breakfast burritos that are freezer-friendly for busy days.

Johnnycake

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While johnnycakes have their roots in indigenous North American cuisine, the modern johnnycake — cornmeal batter that’s been fried on a griddle or in a skillet — originated in Rhode Island. The cornmeal mixture, which is sometimes sweet, is made with yellow or white cornmeal, salt and either hot water or milk. Typically eaten like pancakes with butter and syrup, they’re also often eaten for lunch or dinner with potatoes or rice. Try this easy recipe at home.

Steak and eggs

Dreamstime

You can eat a nice, juicy steak alongside some sunny side-up eggs any time of day, but it’s a wonderfully American way to wake up. In 1961, Alan Shepard was served steak and eggs before the historic trip that made him the first American to travel into space. Ever since then, it's been a tradition for NASA astronauts to eat this hearty breakfast before a launch. This recipe will be done in 15 minutes.

Doughnut

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The classic doughnut is popular in every state, with all kinds of variations in batters, toppings, fillings and flavorings, such as glazed, powdered and jelly-filled, chocolate icing with sprinkles and Boston cream. Doughnuts are a popular accompaniment to a cup of coffee, the perfect pairing for a quick breakfast on-the-go, as seen with the success of world-famous coffee and doughnut chains such as Dunkin’ and Krispy Kreme. Here are some easy doughnuts you can bake at home.

Corned beef hash

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Any dish made with canned meat may be easy to poo-poo at, but then there is corned beef hash. A mix of diced potatoes, onions and salty, cured corned beef, this dish is a simple yet classic breakfast throughout the world. Topped with an egg and served with a side of toast, this seemingly lowly food turns into a chef’s favorite. This recipe is great for pepper lovers.

Shrimp and grits

Dreamstime

A staple of the Southern breakfast table, grits can be eaten with any number of foods, such as fried catfish, country ham, salmon croquettes and bacon and eggs. But it’s the shrimp that is the signature pairing with grits. Traditional to the low country cuisine of the South Carolina and Georgia coasts, you can eat shrimp and grits for lunch or supper too, just be sure to top it all off with a generous pour of hot sauce. The dish even works as a dip.

Avocado toast

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Avocado toast has been one of the top food trends of the past decade, but people in California’s Bay Area have been eating it since at least the late 19th century. Avocado, a fruit with many benefits, is mashed and spread on toast along with some salt, pepper and a bit of lemon or lime juice. Endlessly customizable, you can top off your avocado toast with a fried egg, roasted tomatoes, microgreens, feta cheese or whatever else tickles your fancy. Add yogurt for an extra protein boost.

Bacon, egg and cheese

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The bacon, egg and cheese (or BEC) sandwich is a quick and classic breakfast that features bacon, fried or scrambled eggs and cheese (typically American, cheddar or Swiss). The BEC can be eaten on regular buttered and toasted white bread, a croissant, a kaiser roll or, as is common in New York City, a bagel. Not so common: served on french toast. But hey, give it a try.

Taylor ham, egg and cheese

Dreamstime

Taylor ham, or pork roll as some prefer to call it, is a pork-based processed meat considered an iconic New Jersey food. As such, New Jerseyians often replace the bacon in the BEC with this local meat in a sandwich that is also sometimes known as the Jersey Breakfast. A taylor ham, egg and cheese specifically features a fried egg and American cheese and is served on a bagel, English muffin or hard roll, popularly topped with ketchup, mustard, hot sauce, lettuce and tomato. Daring eats can even try pomegranate mascarpone.

English muffin

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Although created by an Englishman, the English muffin is actually one of the foods you might not know was invented in America. After its introduction in 1880, it quickly became a popular alternative to toast. Baked like a regular muffin, the porous and spongy bread is typically pre-cut so that it can be pulled apart, giving each half a crispier side for toasting. English muffins can always be swapped for toast and topped with jam, honey or eggs or even used as the bread in a breakfast sandwich. Sure, you can buy them. But why not try to make some on your own?

Bagel and lox

First brought to New York City by Jewish immigrants from Poland, the bagel conquered America as a quintessential breakfast food. One of the most classic ways to enjoy a bagel, particularly in New York, is topping it with lox (brined and smoked salmon) and cream cheese. For the full experience, add on a slice of tomato, capers and red onion. If you're not a big breakfast fan, cream cheese and lox fries exist, too.

Dutch baby pancake

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The Dutch baby pancake is one of those foods that no one really makes anymore but should. Despite its name, the dish has its origins at a restaurant in Seattle. Basically a large popover, the Yorkshire pudding-like pancake is baked in a cast-iron pan in the oven. Other fruits and flavorings can be added for different variations, and Dutch baby pancakes are traditionally served with powdered sugar, lemon, fruit toppings, butter or syrup. Be the star of your next brunch with this triple berry recipe.

Toaster pastries

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While you could make toaster pastries at home, they’re generally better from a box. Who hasn’t grabbed a Kellogg’s Pop-Tart or Pillsbury Toaster Strudel in the morning? These thin rectangular confections come with many different icings and can have all sorts of fillings, such as chocolate, strawberry or cinnamon. You could even fill one with pumpkin. Generally designed to be popped in a toaster or heated in the oven, they can also be eaten cold.

Chicken and waffles

Dreamstime

Scrapple

Originating with the Pennsylvania Dutch and known as a mid-Atlantic food, scrapple is mash made out of pork scraps and trimmings, wheat flour, cornmeal and spices, such as thyme, sage and savory. Typically cut from a loaf, slices of scrapple are then pan-fried and can be served plain or eaten with all sorts of sweet and savory condiments like jelly, ketchup, honey, mustard and apple butter. Like any other breakfast food, you can also eat your scrapple in a sandwich or deep-fried.

Cinnamon roll

Cinnamon rolls originated in Scandinavia, but Americans love this sweet, doughy cinnamon treat. The rolled pastry is filled with sugar and best served warm with icing on top for dessert or cream cheese for breakfast. Cinnamon roll retail chain Cinnabon has gained popularity throughout the world, but you can also easily make some fresh at home with the help of a ready-made tube from the grocery store. You can even try to make them from scratch.

Goetta

A regional dish you might not have heard of, goetta is a very popular breakfast sausage in Cincinnati, Ohio. Similar to scrapple and made out of either pork or a mix of pork and beef, goetta also contains oats, bay leaves, thyme, rosemary and onion. Goetta typically comes in a round loaf and can be served like any other breakfast meat, although most like to eat it plain —and it's super easy to make.

Monkey bread

Also known as pull-apart bread or Hungarian coffee cake, monkey bread is a very sweet and sticky pastry made of pieces of cinnamon-sprinkled dough that are picked apart to be eaten. A popular treat at fairs and festivals, monkey bread has its roots in the Hungarian Jewish immigrant community. The smell is sure to drive you crazy when you bake the treat at home.

Breakfast cereal


What to Eat in the Northeast

by Christina Ianzito, Larry Bleiberg, AARP, August 1, 2018 | Comments: 0

En español | The 11 states in New England and the mid-Atlantic area have lots of beloved foods that have been around for at least a century (bagels, salt water taffy, shoofly pie). Many involve seafood and most (depending on how you feel about scrapple) are delicious.

Connecticut: White clam pizza

Clams on pizza? Sure — as long as they are freshly shucked, sauteed in olive oil and garlic and laid on a bed of grated parmesan cheese. Don't even think about mozzarella and absolutely no tomato sauce. Get this thin-crust pie at the celebrated family-owned Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana and don't call it pizza. In New Haven, it's "apizza."

Delaware: Scrapple

Dubious distinction as it may be, Delaware is the nation's scrapple capital. Mystery meat and cousin to North Carolina's livermush, it's basically assorted pig parts which are stewed, minced, mixed with spices, cornmeal and flour, and then baked into small loaves. Slice it off, fry it up and serve it for breakfast.

Michael Ventura / Alamy Stock Photo

Maine: Lobster rolls

Think fresh, chilled lobster meat on a toasted or warm hot dog bun, seasoned with salt and pepper, maybe a touch of mayo and a drizzle of butter. Savor it on a paper plate in front of a seafood shack on the rocky Maine coast and you have an unforgettable, authentic food experience, says Andrew Zimmern, host of the Travel Channel show Bizarre Foods. His go-to spot for lobster rolls is Five Islands Lobster Co., not far from Portland, where “you can literally watch the lobsters come from the traps to the boat to the dock. The lobster you pick has never seen a refrigerator — it’s from the water to the pot to your plate.”

Maryland: Blue crabs

Marylanders are nuts about crabs, which come from the Chesapeake Bay. They can be eaten as a cake or as a whole in the soft shell, but the very best and totally messiest way to eat them is steamed and smothered in Old Bay seasoning mix on a picnic table covered in newspaper or oil cloth — so you can smash them with a mallet and pick out the sweet meat. Here, it's an unforgettable rite of summer.

"Without a doubt, I would drive from Minnesota, where I live, just to have a sandwich at my favorite cheesesteak and pork-sandwich store in America, John’s Roast Pork in Philadelphia."

Massachusetts: New England clam chowder

Sure, you can find this richly flavored cream-based soup of clams, clam juice, onions, salt pork or bacon, and potatoes beyond the Northeast, sometimes listed as Boston clam chowder. You won’t get a better bowl, though, than when it’s made with fresh, sweet local bivalves in a state with such a strong chowder (or, as they say in these parts, “chowdah”) tradition. Herman Melville set an entire chapter of Moby Dick, his 1851 novel, in a Nantucket chowder house. Top spots for the soup in Boston are the city’s oldest restaurant, the Union Oyster House (established 1826), where it’s served chunky with oyster crackers, and nearby Ned Devine’s, an Irish pub in the Faneuil Hall Marketplace, which offers an award-winning version. Note that if your chowdah has tomatoes, you’re probably not in New England that’s a New York thing.

New Hampshire: Apple cider

While it wasn’t named the official beverage until 2010, the Granite State has been pressing fresh apple cider since Colonial times. It comes in the form of the traditional sweet apple juice and as alcoholic hard cider. But most delectable may be the apple cider doughnuts found around the state during autumn harvest.

New Jersey: Saltwater taffy

Tourists in beach towns across America risk their teeth on this wax-paper-wrapped bite-sized treat, which got its start in the late 19th century in Atlantic City. Travelers would line up on the boardwalk at night to watch a machine pull and stretch the taffy, and then wrap and cut it. The chewy sweet actually doesn’t contain salt. Legend claims its name comes from a candymaker’s offhand remark after his shop had been flooded with sea water. When a little girl asked for a piece of candy, the frustrated man muttered, “You mean saltwater taffy?” It now comes in a bewildering number of flavors, from banana split to hot buttered rum.

Robert K. Chin / Alamy Stock Photo

New York: Bagel

There is no substitute for a New York bagel . ask any New Yorker. Some claim it’s the water that makes them unmatchable, and even New Yorkers argue about who makes the best. But many agree that they're tastiest eaten with a "schmear" of cream cheese and maybe a slice of lox. A traditional bagel is formed by hand and then boiled and baked, a process that should give it a crispy crust and a dense interior.

Pennsylvania: Shoofly pie

Made by the Amish in Lancaster County since the 1880s, shoofly is a gooey, supersweet pie made with brown sugar and molasses. Historians say it was first made as a cake, with pie crust added to make it easier to eat with your hands, and that it was typically eaten for breakfast (and may have attracted flies when left on the windowsill to cool). Dutch Haven is said to make the best in the county. Another iconic Pennsylvania food that must be mentioned: the Philly cheesesteak, the famously Philadelphian sandwich made with thinly sliced beef, onions and cheese on a sub/hoagie roll.

Tell us what we missed (or just got wrong) at #greatstatefood

Rhode Island: Stuffies

The state’s shellfish delicacy starts with the quahog, a hard clam that flourishes in Narragansett Bay and is often used in clam chowder. For stuffies, chefs fill the shells with a buttery mixture of bread, minced clams, garlic, onions and sausage, and bake until toasty brown. They’re served in the shells, often with lemon and hot pepper sauce on the side. The stuffie epitomizes the state’s character, says David Dadekian, publisher of the Eat Drink RI newsletter. “There’s frugality in the bread stuffing and the eating of a relatively tough shellfish. … And Rhode Island’s rich immigrant heritage adds the sausage.”

Vermont: Maple creemee

Some who hail from New England call a cone or cup of frozen soft serve a creemee, but it’s not a "real" Vermont creemee without pure Vermont maple syrup and maple sugar. Although all creemees contain the basic dairy ingredients of milk, cream and sugar, most creemees use a high butterfat ratio that produces an ultra-luscious silky treat. You can find creemees at farm stands, ice cream shops and even gas stations, especially in summer.


What to Eat in the Northeast

by Christina Ianzito, Larry Bleiberg, AARP, August 1, 2018 | Comments: 0

En español | The 11 states in New England and the mid-Atlantic area have lots of beloved foods that have been around for at least a century (bagels, salt water taffy, shoofly pie). Many involve seafood and most (depending on how you feel about scrapple) are delicious.

Connecticut: White clam pizza

Clams on pizza? Sure — as long as they are freshly shucked, sauteed in olive oil and garlic and laid on a bed of grated parmesan cheese. Don't even think about mozzarella and absolutely no tomato sauce. Get this thin-crust pie at the celebrated family-owned Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana and don't call it pizza. In New Haven, it's "apizza."

Delaware: Scrapple

Dubious distinction as it may be, Delaware is the nation's scrapple capital. Mystery meat and cousin to North Carolina's livermush, it's basically assorted pig parts which are stewed, minced, mixed with spices, cornmeal and flour, and then baked into small loaves. Slice it off, fry it up and serve it for breakfast.

Michael Ventura / Alamy Stock Photo

Maine: Lobster rolls

Think fresh, chilled lobster meat on a toasted or warm hot dog bun, seasoned with salt and pepper, maybe a touch of mayo and a drizzle of butter. Savor it on a paper plate in front of a seafood shack on the rocky Maine coast and you have an unforgettable, authentic food experience, says Andrew Zimmern, host of the Travel Channel show Bizarre Foods. His go-to spot for lobster rolls is Five Islands Lobster Co., not far from Portland, where “you can literally watch the lobsters come from the traps to the boat to the dock. The lobster you pick has never seen a refrigerator — it’s from the water to the pot to your plate.”

Maryland: Blue crabs

Marylanders are nuts about crabs, which come from the Chesapeake Bay. They can be eaten as a cake or as a whole in the soft shell, but the very best and totally messiest way to eat them is steamed and smothered in Old Bay seasoning mix on a picnic table covered in newspaper or oil cloth — so you can smash them with a mallet and pick out the sweet meat. Here, it's an unforgettable rite of summer.

"Without a doubt, I would drive from Minnesota, where I live, just to have a sandwich at my favorite cheesesteak and pork-sandwich store in America, John’s Roast Pork in Philadelphia."

Massachusetts: New England clam chowder

Sure, you can find this richly flavored cream-based soup of clams, clam juice, onions, salt pork or bacon, and potatoes beyond the Northeast, sometimes listed as Boston clam chowder. You won’t get a better bowl, though, than when it’s made with fresh, sweet local bivalves in a state with such a strong chowder (or, as they say in these parts, “chowdah”) tradition. Herman Melville set an entire chapter of Moby Dick, his 1851 novel, in a Nantucket chowder house. Top spots for the soup in Boston are the city’s oldest restaurant, the Union Oyster House (established 1826), where it’s served chunky with oyster crackers, and nearby Ned Devine’s, an Irish pub in the Faneuil Hall Marketplace, which offers an award-winning version. Note that if your chowdah has tomatoes, you’re probably not in New England that’s a New York thing.

New Hampshire: Apple cider

While it wasn’t named the official beverage until 2010, the Granite State has been pressing fresh apple cider since Colonial times. It comes in the form of the traditional sweet apple juice and as alcoholic hard cider. But most delectable may be the apple cider doughnuts found around the state during autumn harvest.

New Jersey: Saltwater taffy

Tourists in beach towns across America risk their teeth on this wax-paper-wrapped bite-sized treat, which got its start in the late 19th century in Atlantic City. Travelers would line up on the boardwalk at night to watch a machine pull and stretch the taffy, and then wrap and cut it. The chewy sweet actually doesn’t contain salt. Legend claims its name comes from a candymaker’s offhand remark after his shop had been flooded with sea water. When a little girl asked for a piece of candy, the frustrated man muttered, “You mean saltwater taffy?” It now comes in a bewildering number of flavors, from banana split to hot buttered rum.

Robert K. Chin / Alamy Stock Photo

New York: Bagel

There is no substitute for a New York bagel . ask any New Yorker. Some claim it’s the water that makes them unmatchable, and even New Yorkers argue about who makes the best. But many agree that they're tastiest eaten with a "schmear" of cream cheese and maybe a slice of lox. A traditional bagel is formed by hand and then boiled and baked, a process that should give it a crispy crust and a dense interior.

Pennsylvania: Shoofly pie

Made by the Amish in Lancaster County since the 1880s, shoofly is a gooey, supersweet pie made with brown sugar and molasses. Historians say it was first made as a cake, with pie crust added to make it easier to eat with your hands, and that it was typically eaten for breakfast (and may have attracted flies when left on the windowsill to cool). Dutch Haven is said to make the best in the county. Another iconic Pennsylvania food that must be mentioned: the Philly cheesesteak, the famously Philadelphian sandwich made with thinly sliced beef, onions and cheese on a sub/hoagie roll.

Tell us what we missed (or just got wrong) at #greatstatefood

Rhode Island: Stuffies

The state’s shellfish delicacy starts with the quahog, a hard clam that flourishes in Narragansett Bay and is often used in clam chowder. For stuffies, chefs fill the shells with a buttery mixture of bread, minced clams, garlic, onions and sausage, and bake until toasty brown. They’re served in the shells, often with lemon and hot pepper sauce on the side. The stuffie epitomizes the state’s character, says David Dadekian, publisher of the Eat Drink RI newsletter. “There’s frugality in the bread stuffing and the eating of a relatively tough shellfish. … And Rhode Island’s rich immigrant heritage adds the sausage.”

Vermont: Maple creemee

Some who hail from New England call a cone or cup of frozen soft serve a creemee, but it’s not a "real" Vermont creemee without pure Vermont maple syrup and maple sugar. Although all creemees contain the basic dairy ingredients of milk, cream and sugar, most creemees use a high butterfat ratio that produces an ultra-luscious silky treat. You can find creemees at farm stands, ice cream shops and even gas stations, especially in summer.


What to Eat in the Northeast

by Christina Ianzito, Larry Bleiberg, AARP, August 1, 2018 | Comments: 0

En español | The 11 states in New England and the mid-Atlantic area have lots of beloved foods that have been around for at least a century (bagels, salt water taffy, shoofly pie). Many involve seafood and most (depending on how you feel about scrapple) are delicious.

Connecticut: White clam pizza

Clams on pizza? Sure — as long as they are freshly shucked, sauteed in olive oil and garlic and laid on a bed of grated parmesan cheese. Don't even think about mozzarella and absolutely no tomato sauce. Get this thin-crust pie at the celebrated family-owned Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana and don't call it pizza. In New Haven, it's "apizza."

Delaware: Scrapple

Dubious distinction as it may be, Delaware is the nation's scrapple capital. Mystery meat and cousin to North Carolina's livermush, it's basically assorted pig parts which are stewed, minced, mixed with spices, cornmeal and flour, and then baked into small loaves. Slice it off, fry it up and serve it for breakfast.

Michael Ventura / Alamy Stock Photo

Maine: Lobster rolls

Think fresh, chilled lobster meat on a toasted or warm hot dog bun, seasoned with salt and pepper, maybe a touch of mayo and a drizzle of butter. Savor it on a paper plate in front of a seafood shack on the rocky Maine coast and you have an unforgettable, authentic food experience, says Andrew Zimmern, host of the Travel Channel show Bizarre Foods. His go-to spot for lobster rolls is Five Islands Lobster Co., not far from Portland, where “you can literally watch the lobsters come from the traps to the boat to the dock. The lobster you pick has never seen a refrigerator — it’s from the water to the pot to your plate.”

Maryland: Blue crabs

Marylanders are nuts about crabs, which come from the Chesapeake Bay. They can be eaten as a cake or as a whole in the soft shell, but the very best and totally messiest way to eat them is steamed and smothered in Old Bay seasoning mix on a picnic table covered in newspaper or oil cloth — so you can smash them with a mallet and pick out the sweet meat. Here, it's an unforgettable rite of summer.

"Without a doubt, I would drive from Minnesota, where I live, just to have a sandwich at my favorite cheesesteak and pork-sandwich store in America, John’s Roast Pork in Philadelphia."

Massachusetts: New England clam chowder

Sure, you can find this richly flavored cream-based soup of clams, clam juice, onions, salt pork or bacon, and potatoes beyond the Northeast, sometimes listed as Boston clam chowder. You won’t get a better bowl, though, than when it’s made with fresh, sweet local bivalves in a state with such a strong chowder (or, as they say in these parts, “chowdah”) tradition. Herman Melville set an entire chapter of Moby Dick, his 1851 novel, in a Nantucket chowder house. Top spots for the soup in Boston are the city’s oldest restaurant, the Union Oyster House (established 1826), where it’s served chunky with oyster crackers, and nearby Ned Devine’s, an Irish pub in the Faneuil Hall Marketplace, which offers an award-winning version. Note that if your chowdah has tomatoes, you’re probably not in New England that’s a New York thing.

New Hampshire: Apple cider

While it wasn’t named the official beverage until 2010, the Granite State has been pressing fresh apple cider since Colonial times. It comes in the form of the traditional sweet apple juice and as alcoholic hard cider. But most delectable may be the apple cider doughnuts found around the state during autumn harvest.

New Jersey: Saltwater taffy

Tourists in beach towns across America risk their teeth on this wax-paper-wrapped bite-sized treat, which got its start in the late 19th century in Atlantic City. Travelers would line up on the boardwalk at night to watch a machine pull and stretch the taffy, and then wrap and cut it. The chewy sweet actually doesn’t contain salt. Legend claims its name comes from a candymaker’s offhand remark after his shop had been flooded with sea water. When a little girl asked for a piece of candy, the frustrated man muttered, “You mean saltwater taffy?” It now comes in a bewildering number of flavors, from banana split to hot buttered rum.

Robert K. Chin / Alamy Stock Photo

New York: Bagel

There is no substitute for a New York bagel . ask any New Yorker. Some claim it’s the water that makes them unmatchable, and even New Yorkers argue about who makes the best. But many agree that they're tastiest eaten with a "schmear" of cream cheese and maybe a slice of lox. A traditional bagel is formed by hand and then boiled and baked, a process that should give it a crispy crust and a dense interior.

Pennsylvania: Shoofly pie

Made by the Amish in Lancaster County since the 1880s, shoofly is a gooey, supersweet pie made with brown sugar and molasses. Historians say it was first made as a cake, with pie crust added to make it easier to eat with your hands, and that it was typically eaten for breakfast (and may have attracted flies when left on the windowsill to cool). Dutch Haven is said to make the best in the county. Another iconic Pennsylvania food that must be mentioned: the Philly cheesesteak, the famously Philadelphian sandwich made with thinly sliced beef, onions and cheese on a sub/hoagie roll.

Tell us what we missed (or just got wrong) at #greatstatefood

Rhode Island: Stuffies

The state’s shellfish delicacy starts with the quahog, a hard clam that flourishes in Narragansett Bay and is often used in clam chowder. For stuffies, chefs fill the shells with a buttery mixture of bread, minced clams, garlic, onions and sausage, and bake until toasty brown. They’re served in the shells, often with lemon and hot pepper sauce on the side. The stuffie epitomizes the state’s character, says David Dadekian, publisher of the Eat Drink RI newsletter. “There’s frugality in the bread stuffing and the eating of a relatively tough shellfish. … And Rhode Island’s rich immigrant heritage adds the sausage.”

Vermont: Maple creemee

Some who hail from New England call a cone or cup of frozen soft serve a creemee, but it’s not a "real" Vermont creemee without pure Vermont maple syrup and maple sugar. Although all creemees contain the basic dairy ingredients of milk, cream and sugar, most creemees use a high butterfat ratio that produces an ultra-luscious silky treat. You can find creemees at farm stands, ice cream shops and even gas stations, especially in summer.


What to Eat in the Northeast

by Christina Ianzito, Larry Bleiberg, AARP, August 1, 2018 | Comments: 0

En español | The 11 states in New England and the mid-Atlantic area have lots of beloved foods that have been around for at least a century (bagels, salt water taffy, shoofly pie). Many involve seafood and most (depending on how you feel about scrapple) are delicious.

Connecticut: White clam pizza

Clams on pizza? Sure — as long as they are freshly shucked, sauteed in olive oil and garlic and laid on a bed of grated parmesan cheese. Don't even think about mozzarella and absolutely no tomato sauce. Get this thin-crust pie at the celebrated family-owned Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana and don't call it pizza. In New Haven, it's "apizza."

Delaware: Scrapple

Dubious distinction as it may be, Delaware is the nation's scrapple capital. Mystery meat and cousin to North Carolina's livermush, it's basically assorted pig parts which are stewed, minced, mixed with spices, cornmeal and flour, and then baked into small loaves. Slice it off, fry it up and serve it for breakfast.

Michael Ventura / Alamy Stock Photo

Maine: Lobster rolls

Think fresh, chilled lobster meat on a toasted or warm hot dog bun, seasoned with salt and pepper, maybe a touch of mayo and a drizzle of butter. Savor it on a paper plate in front of a seafood shack on the rocky Maine coast and you have an unforgettable, authentic food experience, says Andrew Zimmern, host of the Travel Channel show Bizarre Foods. His go-to spot for lobster rolls is Five Islands Lobster Co., not far from Portland, where “you can literally watch the lobsters come from the traps to the boat to the dock. The lobster you pick has never seen a refrigerator — it’s from the water to the pot to your plate.”

Maryland: Blue crabs

Marylanders are nuts about crabs, which come from the Chesapeake Bay. They can be eaten as a cake or as a whole in the soft shell, but the very best and totally messiest way to eat them is steamed and smothered in Old Bay seasoning mix on a picnic table covered in newspaper or oil cloth — so you can smash them with a mallet and pick out the sweet meat. Here, it's an unforgettable rite of summer.

"Without a doubt, I would drive from Minnesota, where I live, just to have a sandwich at my favorite cheesesteak and pork-sandwich store in America, John’s Roast Pork in Philadelphia."

Massachusetts: New England clam chowder

Sure, you can find this richly flavored cream-based soup of clams, clam juice, onions, salt pork or bacon, and potatoes beyond the Northeast, sometimes listed as Boston clam chowder. You won’t get a better bowl, though, than when it’s made with fresh, sweet local bivalves in a state with such a strong chowder (or, as they say in these parts, “chowdah”) tradition. Herman Melville set an entire chapter of Moby Dick, his 1851 novel, in a Nantucket chowder house. Top spots for the soup in Boston are the city’s oldest restaurant, the Union Oyster House (established 1826), where it’s served chunky with oyster crackers, and nearby Ned Devine’s, an Irish pub in the Faneuil Hall Marketplace, which offers an award-winning version. Note that if your chowdah has tomatoes, you’re probably not in New England that’s a New York thing.

New Hampshire: Apple cider

While it wasn’t named the official beverage until 2010, the Granite State has been pressing fresh apple cider since Colonial times. It comes in the form of the traditional sweet apple juice and as alcoholic hard cider. But most delectable may be the apple cider doughnuts found around the state during autumn harvest.

New Jersey: Saltwater taffy

Tourists in beach towns across America risk their teeth on this wax-paper-wrapped bite-sized treat, which got its start in the late 19th century in Atlantic City. Travelers would line up on the boardwalk at night to watch a machine pull and stretch the taffy, and then wrap and cut it. The chewy sweet actually doesn’t contain salt. Legend claims its name comes from a candymaker’s offhand remark after his shop had been flooded with sea water. When a little girl asked for a piece of candy, the frustrated man muttered, “You mean saltwater taffy?” It now comes in a bewildering number of flavors, from banana split to hot buttered rum.

Robert K. Chin / Alamy Stock Photo

New York: Bagel

There is no substitute for a New York bagel . ask any New Yorker. Some claim it’s the water that makes them unmatchable, and even New Yorkers argue about who makes the best. But many agree that they're tastiest eaten with a "schmear" of cream cheese and maybe a slice of lox. A traditional bagel is formed by hand and then boiled and baked, a process that should give it a crispy crust and a dense interior.

Pennsylvania: Shoofly pie

Made by the Amish in Lancaster County since the 1880s, shoofly is a gooey, supersweet pie made with brown sugar and molasses. Historians say it was first made as a cake, with pie crust added to make it easier to eat with your hands, and that it was typically eaten for breakfast (and may have attracted flies when left on the windowsill to cool). Dutch Haven is said to make the best in the county. Another iconic Pennsylvania food that must be mentioned: the Philly cheesesteak, the famously Philadelphian sandwich made with thinly sliced beef, onions and cheese on a sub/hoagie roll.

Tell us what we missed (or just got wrong) at #greatstatefood

Rhode Island: Stuffies

The state’s shellfish delicacy starts with the quahog, a hard clam that flourishes in Narragansett Bay and is often used in clam chowder. For stuffies, chefs fill the shells with a buttery mixture of bread, minced clams, garlic, onions and sausage, and bake until toasty brown. They’re served in the shells, often with lemon and hot pepper sauce on the side. The stuffie epitomizes the state’s character, says David Dadekian, publisher of the Eat Drink RI newsletter. “There’s frugality in the bread stuffing and the eating of a relatively tough shellfish. … And Rhode Island’s rich immigrant heritage adds the sausage.”

Vermont: Maple creemee

Some who hail from New England call a cone or cup of frozen soft serve a creemee, but it’s not a "real" Vermont creemee without pure Vermont maple syrup and maple sugar. Although all creemees contain the basic dairy ingredients of milk, cream and sugar, most creemees use a high butterfat ratio that produces an ultra-luscious silky treat. You can find creemees at farm stands, ice cream shops and even gas stations, especially in summer.


What to Eat in the Northeast

by Christina Ianzito, Larry Bleiberg, AARP, August 1, 2018 | Comments: 0

En español | The 11 states in New England and the mid-Atlantic area have lots of beloved foods that have been around for at least a century (bagels, salt water taffy, shoofly pie). Many involve seafood and most (depending on how you feel about scrapple) are delicious.

Connecticut: White clam pizza

Clams on pizza? Sure — as long as they are freshly shucked, sauteed in olive oil and garlic and laid on a bed of grated parmesan cheese. Don't even think about mozzarella and absolutely no tomato sauce. Get this thin-crust pie at the celebrated family-owned Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana and don't call it pizza. In New Haven, it's "apizza."

Delaware: Scrapple

Dubious distinction as it may be, Delaware is the nation's scrapple capital. Mystery meat and cousin to North Carolina's livermush, it's basically assorted pig parts which are stewed, minced, mixed with spices, cornmeal and flour, and then baked into small loaves. Slice it off, fry it up and serve it for breakfast.

Michael Ventura / Alamy Stock Photo

Maine: Lobster rolls

Think fresh, chilled lobster meat on a toasted or warm hot dog bun, seasoned with salt and pepper, maybe a touch of mayo and a drizzle of butter. Savor it on a paper plate in front of a seafood shack on the rocky Maine coast and you have an unforgettable, authentic food experience, says Andrew Zimmern, host of the Travel Channel show Bizarre Foods. His go-to spot for lobster rolls is Five Islands Lobster Co., not far from Portland, where “you can literally watch the lobsters come from the traps to the boat to the dock. The lobster you pick has never seen a refrigerator — it’s from the water to the pot to your plate.”

Maryland: Blue crabs

Marylanders are nuts about crabs, which come from the Chesapeake Bay. They can be eaten as a cake or as a whole in the soft shell, but the very best and totally messiest way to eat them is steamed and smothered in Old Bay seasoning mix on a picnic table covered in newspaper or oil cloth — so you can smash them with a mallet and pick out the sweet meat. Here, it's an unforgettable rite of summer.

"Without a doubt, I would drive from Minnesota, where I live, just to have a sandwich at my favorite cheesesteak and pork-sandwich store in America, John’s Roast Pork in Philadelphia."

Massachusetts: New England clam chowder

Sure, you can find this richly flavored cream-based soup of clams, clam juice, onions, salt pork or bacon, and potatoes beyond the Northeast, sometimes listed as Boston clam chowder. You won’t get a better bowl, though, than when it’s made with fresh, sweet local bivalves in a state with such a strong chowder (or, as they say in these parts, “chowdah”) tradition. Herman Melville set an entire chapter of Moby Dick, his 1851 novel, in a Nantucket chowder house. Top spots for the soup in Boston are the city’s oldest restaurant, the Union Oyster House (established 1826), where it’s served chunky with oyster crackers, and nearby Ned Devine’s, an Irish pub in the Faneuil Hall Marketplace, which offers an award-winning version. Note that if your chowdah has tomatoes, you’re probably not in New England that’s a New York thing.

New Hampshire: Apple cider

While it wasn’t named the official beverage until 2010, the Granite State has been pressing fresh apple cider since Colonial times. It comes in the form of the traditional sweet apple juice and as alcoholic hard cider. But most delectable may be the apple cider doughnuts found around the state during autumn harvest.

New Jersey: Saltwater taffy

Tourists in beach towns across America risk their teeth on this wax-paper-wrapped bite-sized treat, which got its start in the late 19th century in Atlantic City. Travelers would line up on the boardwalk at night to watch a machine pull and stretch the taffy, and then wrap and cut it. The chewy sweet actually doesn’t contain salt. Legend claims its name comes from a candymaker’s offhand remark after his shop had been flooded with sea water. When a little girl asked for a piece of candy, the frustrated man muttered, “You mean saltwater taffy?” It now comes in a bewildering number of flavors, from banana split to hot buttered rum.

Robert K. Chin / Alamy Stock Photo

New York: Bagel

There is no substitute for a New York bagel . ask any New Yorker. Some claim it’s the water that makes them unmatchable, and even New Yorkers argue about who makes the best. But many agree that they're tastiest eaten with a "schmear" of cream cheese and maybe a slice of lox. A traditional bagel is formed by hand and then boiled and baked, a process that should give it a crispy crust and a dense interior.

Pennsylvania: Shoofly pie

Made by the Amish in Lancaster County since the 1880s, shoofly is a gooey, supersweet pie made with brown sugar and molasses. Historians say it was first made as a cake, with pie crust added to make it easier to eat with your hands, and that it was typically eaten for breakfast (and may have attracted flies when left on the windowsill to cool). Dutch Haven is said to make the best in the county. Another iconic Pennsylvania food that must be mentioned: the Philly cheesesteak, the famously Philadelphian sandwich made with thinly sliced beef, onions and cheese on a sub/hoagie roll.

Tell us what we missed (or just got wrong) at #greatstatefood

Rhode Island: Stuffies

The state’s shellfish delicacy starts with the quahog, a hard clam that flourishes in Narragansett Bay and is often used in clam chowder. For stuffies, chefs fill the shells with a buttery mixture of bread, minced clams, garlic, onions and sausage, and bake until toasty brown. They’re served in the shells, often with lemon and hot pepper sauce on the side. The stuffie epitomizes the state’s character, says David Dadekian, publisher of the Eat Drink RI newsletter. “There’s frugality in the bread stuffing and the eating of a relatively tough shellfish. … And Rhode Island’s rich immigrant heritage adds the sausage.”

Vermont: Maple creemee

Some who hail from New England call a cone or cup of frozen soft serve a creemee, but it’s not a "real" Vermont creemee without pure Vermont maple syrup and maple sugar. Although all creemees contain the basic dairy ingredients of milk, cream and sugar, most creemees use a high butterfat ratio that produces an ultra-luscious silky treat. You can find creemees at farm stands, ice cream shops and even gas stations, especially in summer.


What to Eat in the Northeast

by Christina Ianzito, Larry Bleiberg, AARP, August 1, 2018 | Comments: 0

En español | The 11 states in New England and the mid-Atlantic area have lots of beloved foods that have been around for at least a century (bagels, salt water taffy, shoofly pie). Many involve seafood and most (depending on how you feel about scrapple) are delicious.

Connecticut: White clam pizza

Clams on pizza? Sure — as long as they are freshly shucked, sauteed in olive oil and garlic and laid on a bed of grated parmesan cheese. Don't even think about mozzarella and absolutely no tomato sauce. Get this thin-crust pie at the celebrated family-owned Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana and don't call it pizza. In New Haven, it's "apizza."

Delaware: Scrapple

Dubious distinction as it may be, Delaware is the nation's scrapple capital. Mystery meat and cousin to North Carolina's livermush, it's basically assorted pig parts which are stewed, minced, mixed with spices, cornmeal and flour, and then baked into small loaves. Slice it off, fry it up and serve it for breakfast.

Michael Ventura / Alamy Stock Photo

Maine: Lobster rolls

Think fresh, chilled lobster meat on a toasted or warm hot dog bun, seasoned with salt and pepper, maybe a touch of mayo and a drizzle of butter. Savor it on a paper plate in front of a seafood shack on the rocky Maine coast and you have an unforgettable, authentic food experience, says Andrew Zimmern, host of the Travel Channel show Bizarre Foods. His go-to spot for lobster rolls is Five Islands Lobster Co., not far from Portland, where “you can literally watch the lobsters come from the traps to the boat to the dock. The lobster you pick has never seen a refrigerator — it’s from the water to the pot to your plate.”

Maryland: Blue crabs

Marylanders are nuts about crabs, which come from the Chesapeake Bay. They can be eaten as a cake or as a whole in the soft shell, but the very best and totally messiest way to eat them is steamed and smothered in Old Bay seasoning mix on a picnic table covered in newspaper or oil cloth — so you can smash them with a mallet and pick out the sweet meat. Here, it's an unforgettable rite of summer.

"Without a doubt, I would drive from Minnesota, where I live, just to have a sandwich at my favorite cheesesteak and pork-sandwich store in America, John’s Roast Pork in Philadelphia."

Massachusetts: New England clam chowder

Sure, you can find this richly flavored cream-based soup of clams, clam juice, onions, salt pork or bacon, and potatoes beyond the Northeast, sometimes listed as Boston clam chowder. You won’t get a better bowl, though, than when it’s made with fresh, sweet local bivalves in a state with such a strong chowder (or, as they say in these parts, “chowdah”) tradition. Herman Melville set an entire chapter of Moby Dick, his 1851 novel, in a Nantucket chowder house. Top spots for the soup in Boston are the city’s oldest restaurant, the Union Oyster House (established 1826), where it’s served chunky with oyster crackers, and nearby Ned Devine’s, an Irish pub in the Faneuil Hall Marketplace, which offers an award-winning version. Note that if your chowdah has tomatoes, you’re probably not in New England that’s a New York thing.

New Hampshire: Apple cider

While it wasn’t named the official beverage until 2010, the Granite State has been pressing fresh apple cider since Colonial times. It comes in the form of the traditional sweet apple juice and as alcoholic hard cider. But most delectable may be the apple cider doughnuts found around the state during autumn harvest.

New Jersey: Saltwater taffy

Tourists in beach towns across America risk their teeth on this wax-paper-wrapped bite-sized treat, which got its start in the late 19th century in Atlantic City. Travelers would line up on the boardwalk at night to watch a machine pull and stretch the taffy, and then wrap and cut it. The chewy sweet actually doesn’t contain salt. Legend claims its name comes from a candymaker’s offhand remark after his shop had been flooded with sea water. When a little girl asked for a piece of candy, the frustrated man muttered, “You mean saltwater taffy?” It now comes in a bewildering number of flavors, from banana split to hot buttered rum.

Robert K. Chin / Alamy Stock Photo

New York: Bagel

There is no substitute for a New York bagel . ask any New Yorker. Some claim it’s the water that makes them unmatchable, and even New Yorkers argue about who makes the best. But many agree that they're tastiest eaten with a "schmear" of cream cheese and maybe a slice of lox. A traditional bagel is formed by hand and then boiled and baked, a process that should give it a crispy crust and a dense interior.

Pennsylvania: Shoofly pie

Made by the Amish in Lancaster County since the 1880s, shoofly is a gooey, supersweet pie made with brown sugar and molasses. Historians say it was first made as a cake, with pie crust added to make it easier to eat with your hands, and that it was typically eaten for breakfast (and may have attracted flies when left on the windowsill to cool). Dutch Haven is said to make the best in the county. Another iconic Pennsylvania food that must be mentioned: the Philly cheesesteak, the famously Philadelphian sandwich made with thinly sliced beef, onions and cheese on a sub/hoagie roll.

Tell us what we missed (or just got wrong) at #greatstatefood

Rhode Island: Stuffies

The state’s shellfish delicacy starts with the quahog, a hard clam that flourishes in Narragansett Bay and is often used in clam chowder. For stuffies, chefs fill the shells with a buttery mixture of bread, minced clams, garlic, onions and sausage, and bake until toasty brown. They’re served in the shells, often with lemon and hot pepper sauce on the side. The stuffie epitomizes the state’s character, says David Dadekian, publisher of the Eat Drink RI newsletter. “There’s frugality in the bread stuffing and the eating of a relatively tough shellfish. … And Rhode Island’s rich immigrant heritage adds the sausage.”

Vermont: Maple creemee

Some who hail from New England call a cone or cup of frozen soft serve a creemee, but it’s not a "real" Vermont creemee without pure Vermont maple syrup and maple sugar. Although all creemees contain the basic dairy ingredients of milk, cream and sugar, most creemees use a high butterfat ratio that produces an ultra-luscious silky treat. You can find creemees at farm stands, ice cream shops and even gas stations, especially in summer.


What to Eat in the Northeast

by Christina Ianzito, Larry Bleiberg, AARP, August 1, 2018 | Comments: 0

En español | The 11 states in New England and the mid-Atlantic area have lots of beloved foods that have been around for at least a century (bagels, salt water taffy, shoofly pie). Many involve seafood and most (depending on how you feel about scrapple) are delicious.

Connecticut: White clam pizza

Clams on pizza? Sure — as long as they are freshly shucked, sauteed in olive oil and garlic and laid on a bed of grated parmesan cheese. Don't even think about mozzarella and absolutely no tomato sauce. Get this thin-crust pie at the celebrated family-owned Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana and don't call it pizza. In New Haven, it's "apizza."

Delaware: Scrapple

Dubious distinction as it may be, Delaware is the nation's scrapple capital. Mystery meat and cousin to North Carolina's livermush, it's basically assorted pig parts which are stewed, minced, mixed with spices, cornmeal and flour, and then baked into small loaves. Slice it off, fry it up and serve it for breakfast.

Michael Ventura / Alamy Stock Photo

Maine: Lobster rolls

Think fresh, chilled lobster meat on a toasted or warm hot dog bun, seasoned with salt and pepper, maybe a touch of mayo and a drizzle of butter. Savor it on a paper plate in front of a seafood shack on the rocky Maine coast and you have an unforgettable, authentic food experience, says Andrew Zimmern, host of the Travel Channel show Bizarre Foods. His go-to spot for lobster rolls is Five Islands Lobster Co., not far from Portland, where “you can literally watch the lobsters come from the traps to the boat to the dock. The lobster you pick has never seen a refrigerator — it’s from the water to the pot to your plate.”

Maryland: Blue crabs

Marylanders are nuts about crabs, which come from the Chesapeake Bay. They can be eaten as a cake or as a whole in the soft shell, but the very best and totally messiest way to eat them is steamed and smothered in Old Bay seasoning mix on a picnic table covered in newspaper or oil cloth — so you can smash them with a mallet and pick out the sweet meat. Here, it's an unforgettable rite of summer.

"Without a doubt, I would drive from Minnesota, where I live, just to have a sandwich at my favorite cheesesteak and pork-sandwich store in America, John’s Roast Pork in Philadelphia."

Massachusetts: New England clam chowder

Sure, you can find this richly flavored cream-based soup of clams, clam juice, onions, salt pork or bacon, and potatoes beyond the Northeast, sometimes listed as Boston clam chowder. You won’t get a better bowl, though, than when it’s made with fresh, sweet local bivalves in a state with such a strong chowder (or, as they say in these parts, “chowdah”) tradition. Herman Melville set an entire chapter of Moby Dick, his 1851 novel, in a Nantucket chowder house. Top spots for the soup in Boston are the city’s oldest restaurant, the Union Oyster House (established 1826), where it’s served chunky with oyster crackers, and nearby Ned Devine’s, an Irish pub in the Faneuil Hall Marketplace, which offers an award-winning version. Note that if your chowdah has tomatoes, you’re probably not in New England that’s a New York thing.

New Hampshire: Apple cider

While it wasn’t named the official beverage until 2010, the Granite State has been pressing fresh apple cider since Colonial times. It comes in the form of the traditional sweet apple juice and as alcoholic hard cider. But most delectable may be the apple cider doughnuts found around the state during autumn harvest.

New Jersey: Saltwater taffy

Tourists in beach towns across America risk their teeth on this wax-paper-wrapped bite-sized treat, which got its start in the late 19th century in Atlantic City. Travelers would line up on the boardwalk at night to watch a machine pull and stretch the taffy, and then wrap and cut it. The chewy sweet actually doesn’t contain salt. Legend claims its name comes from a candymaker’s offhand remark after his shop had been flooded with sea water. When a little girl asked for a piece of candy, the frustrated man muttered, “You mean saltwater taffy?” It now comes in a bewildering number of flavors, from banana split to hot buttered rum.

Robert K. Chin / Alamy Stock Photo

New York: Bagel

There is no substitute for a New York bagel . ask any New Yorker. Some claim it’s the water that makes them unmatchable, and even New Yorkers argue about who makes the best. But many agree that they're tastiest eaten with a "schmear" of cream cheese and maybe a slice of lox. A traditional bagel is formed by hand and then boiled and baked, a process that should give it a crispy crust and a dense interior.

Pennsylvania: Shoofly pie

Made by the Amish in Lancaster County since the 1880s, shoofly is a gooey, supersweet pie made with brown sugar and molasses. Historians say it was first made as a cake, with pie crust added to make it easier to eat with your hands, and that it was typically eaten for breakfast (and may have attracted flies when left on the windowsill to cool). Dutch Haven is said to make the best in the county. Another iconic Pennsylvania food that must be mentioned: the Philly cheesesteak, the famously Philadelphian sandwich made with thinly sliced beef, onions and cheese on a sub/hoagie roll.

Tell us what we missed (or just got wrong) at #greatstatefood

Rhode Island: Stuffies

The state’s shellfish delicacy starts with the quahog, a hard clam that flourishes in Narragansett Bay and is often used in clam chowder. For stuffies, chefs fill the shells with a buttery mixture of bread, minced clams, garlic, onions and sausage, and bake until toasty brown. They’re served in the shells, often with lemon and hot pepper sauce on the side. The stuffie epitomizes the state’s character, says David Dadekian, publisher of the Eat Drink RI newsletter. “There’s frugality in the bread stuffing and the eating of a relatively tough shellfish. … And Rhode Island’s rich immigrant heritage adds the sausage.”

Vermont: Maple creemee

Some who hail from New England call a cone or cup of frozen soft serve a creemee, but it’s not a "real" Vermont creemee without pure Vermont maple syrup and maple sugar. Although all creemees contain the basic dairy ingredients of milk, cream and sugar, most creemees use a high butterfat ratio that produces an ultra-luscious silky treat. You can find creemees at farm stands, ice cream shops and even gas stations, especially in summer.


What to Eat in the Northeast

by Christina Ianzito, Larry Bleiberg, AARP, August 1, 2018 | Comments: 0

En español | The 11 states in New England and the mid-Atlantic area have lots of beloved foods that have been around for at least a century (bagels, salt water taffy, shoofly pie). Many involve seafood and most (depending on how you feel about scrapple) are delicious.

Connecticut: White clam pizza

Clams on pizza? Sure — as long as they are freshly shucked, sauteed in olive oil and garlic and laid on a bed of grated parmesan cheese. Don't even think about mozzarella and absolutely no tomato sauce. Get this thin-crust pie at the celebrated family-owned Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana and don't call it pizza. In New Haven, it's "apizza."

Delaware: Scrapple

Dubious distinction as it may be, Delaware is the nation's scrapple capital. Mystery meat and cousin to North Carolina's livermush, it's basically assorted pig parts which are stewed, minced, mixed with spices, cornmeal and flour, and then baked into small loaves. Slice it off, fry it up and serve it for breakfast.

Michael Ventura / Alamy Stock Photo

Maine: Lobster rolls

Think fresh, chilled lobster meat on a toasted or warm hot dog bun, seasoned with salt and pepper, maybe a touch of mayo and a drizzle of butter. Savor it on a paper plate in front of a seafood shack on the rocky Maine coast and you have an unforgettable, authentic food experience, says Andrew Zimmern, host of the Travel Channel show Bizarre Foods. His go-to spot for lobster rolls is Five Islands Lobster Co., not far from Portland, where “you can literally watch the lobsters come from the traps to the boat to the dock. The lobster you pick has never seen a refrigerator — it’s from the water to the pot to your plate.”

Maryland: Blue crabs

Marylanders are nuts about crabs, which come from the Chesapeake Bay. They can be eaten as a cake or as a whole in the soft shell, but the very best and totally messiest way to eat them is steamed and smothered in Old Bay seasoning mix on a picnic table covered in newspaper or oil cloth — so you can smash them with a mallet and pick out the sweet meat. Here, it's an unforgettable rite of summer.

"Without a doubt, I would drive from Minnesota, where I live, just to have a sandwich at my favorite cheesesteak and pork-sandwich store in America, John’s Roast Pork in Philadelphia."

Massachusetts: New England clam chowder

Sure, you can find this richly flavored cream-based soup of clams, clam juice, onions, salt pork or bacon, and potatoes beyond the Northeast, sometimes listed as Boston clam chowder. You won’t get a better bowl, though, than when it’s made with fresh, sweet local bivalves in a state with such a strong chowder (or, as they say in these parts, “chowdah”) tradition. Herman Melville set an entire chapter of Moby Dick, his 1851 novel, in a Nantucket chowder house. Top spots for the soup in Boston are the city’s oldest restaurant, the Union Oyster House (established 1826), where it’s served chunky with oyster crackers, and nearby Ned Devine’s, an Irish pub in the Faneuil Hall Marketplace, which offers an award-winning version. Note that if your chowdah has tomatoes, you’re probably not in New England that’s a New York thing.

New Hampshire: Apple cider

While it wasn’t named the official beverage until 2010, the Granite State has been pressing fresh apple cider since Colonial times. It comes in the form of the traditional sweet apple juice and as alcoholic hard cider. But most delectable may be the apple cider doughnuts found around the state during autumn harvest.

New Jersey: Saltwater taffy

Tourists in beach towns across America risk their teeth on this wax-paper-wrapped bite-sized treat, which got its start in the late 19th century in Atlantic City. Travelers would line up on the boardwalk at night to watch a machine pull and stretch the taffy, and then wrap and cut it. The chewy sweet actually doesn’t contain salt. Legend claims its name comes from a candymaker’s offhand remark after his shop had been flooded with sea water. When a little girl asked for a piece of candy, the frustrated man muttered, “You mean saltwater taffy?” It now comes in a bewildering number of flavors, from banana split to hot buttered rum.

Robert K. Chin / Alamy Stock Photo

New York: Bagel

There is no substitute for a New York bagel . ask any New Yorker. Some claim it’s the water that makes them unmatchable, and even New Yorkers argue about who makes the best. But many agree that they're tastiest eaten with a "schmear" of cream cheese and maybe a slice of lox. A traditional bagel is formed by hand and then boiled and baked, a process that should give it a crispy crust and a dense interior.

Pennsylvania: Shoofly pie

Made by the Amish in Lancaster County since the 1880s, shoofly is a gooey, supersweet pie made with brown sugar and molasses. Historians say it was first made as a cake, with pie crust added to make it easier to eat with your hands, and that it was typically eaten for breakfast (and may have attracted flies when left on the windowsill to cool). Dutch Haven is said to make the best in the county. Another iconic Pennsylvania food that must be mentioned: the Philly cheesesteak, the famously Philadelphian sandwich made with thinly sliced beef, onions and cheese on a sub/hoagie roll.

Tell us what we missed (or just got wrong) at #greatstatefood

Rhode Island: Stuffies

The state’s shellfish delicacy starts with the quahog, a hard clam that flourishes in Narragansett Bay and is often used in clam chowder. For stuffies, chefs fill the shells with a buttery mixture of bread, minced clams, garlic, onions and sausage, and bake until toasty brown. They’re served in the shells, often with lemon and hot pepper sauce on the side. The stuffie epitomizes the state’s character, says David Dadekian, publisher of the Eat Drink RI newsletter. “There’s frugality in the bread stuffing and the eating of a relatively tough shellfish. … And Rhode Island’s rich immigrant heritage adds the sausage.”

Vermont: Maple creemee

Some who hail from New England call a cone or cup of frozen soft serve a creemee, but it’s not a "real" Vermont creemee without pure Vermont maple syrup and maple sugar. Although all creemees contain the basic dairy ingredients of milk, cream and sugar, most creemees use a high butterfat ratio that produces an ultra-luscious silky treat. You can find creemees at farm stands, ice cream shops and even gas stations, especially in summer.


What to Eat in the Northeast

by Christina Ianzito, Larry Bleiberg, AARP, August 1, 2018 | Comments: 0

En español | The 11 states in New England and the mid-Atlantic area have lots of beloved foods that have been around for at least a century (bagels, salt water taffy, shoofly pie). Many involve seafood and most (depending on how you feel about scrapple) are delicious.

Connecticut: White clam pizza

Clams on pizza? Sure — as long as they are freshly shucked, sauteed in olive oil and garlic and laid on a bed of grated parmesan cheese. Don't even think about mozzarella and absolutely no tomato sauce. Get this thin-crust pie at the celebrated family-owned Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana and don't call it pizza. In New Haven, it's "apizza."

Delaware: Scrapple

Dubious distinction as it may be, Delaware is the nation's scrapple capital. Mystery meat and cousin to North Carolina's livermush, it's basically assorted pig parts which are stewed, minced, mixed with spices, cornmeal and flour, and then baked into small loaves. Slice it off, fry it up and serve it for breakfast.

Michael Ventura / Alamy Stock Photo

Maine: Lobster rolls

Think fresh, chilled lobster meat on a toasted or warm hot dog bun, seasoned with salt and pepper, maybe a touch of mayo and a drizzle of butter. Savor it on a paper plate in front of a seafood shack on the rocky Maine coast and you have an unforgettable, authentic food experience, says Andrew Zimmern, host of the Travel Channel show Bizarre Foods. His go-to spot for lobster rolls is Five Islands Lobster Co., not far from Portland, where “you can literally watch the lobsters come from the traps to the boat to the dock. The lobster you pick has never seen a refrigerator — it’s from the water to the pot to your plate.”

Maryland: Blue crabs

Marylanders are nuts about crabs, which come from the Chesapeake Bay. They can be eaten as a cake or as a whole in the soft shell, but the very best and totally messiest way to eat them is steamed and smothered in Old Bay seasoning mix on a picnic table covered in newspaper or oil cloth — so you can smash them with a mallet and pick out the sweet meat. Here, it's an unforgettable rite of summer.

"Without a doubt, I would drive from Minnesota, where I live, just to have a sandwich at my favorite cheesesteak and pork-sandwich store in America, John’s Roast Pork in Philadelphia."

Massachusetts: New England clam chowder

Sure, you can find this richly flavored cream-based soup of clams, clam juice, onions, salt pork or bacon, and potatoes beyond the Northeast, sometimes listed as Boston clam chowder. You won’t get a better bowl, though, than when it’s made with fresh, sweet local bivalves in a state with such a strong chowder (or, as they say in these parts, “chowdah”) tradition. Herman Melville set an entire chapter of Moby Dick, his 1851 novel, in a Nantucket chowder house. Top spots for the soup in Boston are the city’s oldest restaurant, the Union Oyster House (established 1826), where it’s served chunky with oyster crackers, and nearby Ned Devine’s, an Irish pub in the Faneuil Hall Marketplace, which offers an award-winning version. Note that if your chowdah has tomatoes, you’re probably not in New England that’s a New York thing.

New Hampshire: Apple cider

While it wasn’t named the official beverage until 2010, the Granite State has been pressing fresh apple cider since Colonial times. It comes in the form of the traditional sweet apple juice and as alcoholic hard cider. But most delectable may be the apple cider doughnuts found around the state during autumn harvest.

New Jersey: Saltwater taffy

Tourists in beach towns across America risk their teeth on this wax-paper-wrapped bite-sized treat, which got its start in the late 19th century in Atlantic City. Travelers would line up on the boardwalk at night to watch a machine pull and stretch the taffy, and then wrap and cut it. The chewy sweet actually doesn’t contain salt. Legend claims its name comes from a candymaker’s offhand remark after his shop had been flooded with sea water. When a little girl asked for a piece of candy, the frustrated man muttered, “You mean saltwater taffy?” It now comes in a bewildering number of flavors, from banana split to hot buttered rum.

Robert K. Chin / Alamy Stock Photo

New York: Bagel

There is no substitute for a New York bagel . ask any New Yorker. Some claim it’s the water that makes them unmatchable, and even New Yorkers argue about who makes the best. But many agree that they're tastiest eaten with a "schmear" of cream cheese and maybe a slice of lox. A traditional bagel is formed by hand and then boiled and baked, a process that should give it a crispy crust and a dense interior.

Pennsylvania: Shoofly pie

Made by the Amish in Lancaster County since the 1880s, shoofly is a gooey, supersweet pie made with brown sugar and molasses. Historians say it was first made as a cake, with pie crust added to make it easier to eat with your hands, and that it was typically eaten for breakfast (and may have attracted flies when left on the windowsill to cool). Dutch Haven is said to make the best in the county. Another iconic Pennsylvania food that must be mentioned: the Philly cheesesteak, the famously Philadelphian sandwich made with thinly sliced beef, onions and cheese on a sub/hoagie roll.

Tell us what we missed (or just got wrong) at #greatstatefood

Rhode Island: Stuffies

The state’s shellfish delicacy starts with the quahog, a hard clam that flourishes in Narragansett Bay and is often used in clam chowder. For stuffies, chefs fill the shells with a buttery mixture of bread, minced clams, garlic, onions and sausage, and bake until toasty brown. They’re served in the shells, often with lemon and hot pepper sauce on the side. The stuffie epitomizes the state’s character, says David Dadekian, publisher of the Eat Drink RI newsletter. “There’s frugality in the bread stuffing and the eating of a relatively tough shellfish. … And Rhode Island’s rich immigrant heritage adds the sausage.”

Vermont: Maple creemee

Some who hail from New England call a cone or cup of frozen soft serve a creemee, but it’s not a "real" Vermont creemee without pure Vermont maple syrup and maple sugar. Although all creemees contain the basic dairy ingredients of milk, cream and sugar, most creemees use a high butterfat ratio that produces an ultra-luscious silky treat. You can find creemees at farm stands, ice cream shops and even gas stations, especially in summer.


What to Eat in the Northeast

by Christina Ianzito, Larry Bleiberg, AARP, August 1, 2018 | Comments: 0

En español | The 11 states in New England and the mid-Atlantic area have lots of beloved foods that have been around for at least a century (bagels, salt water taffy, shoofly pie). Many involve seafood and most (depending on how you feel about scrapple) are delicious.

Connecticut: White clam pizza

Clams on pizza? Sure — as long as they are freshly shucked, sauteed in olive oil and garlic and laid on a bed of grated parmesan cheese. Don't even think about mozzarella and absolutely no tomato sauce. Get this thin-crust pie at the celebrated family-owned Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana and don't call it pizza. In New Haven, it's "apizza."

Delaware: Scrapple

Dubious distinction as it may be, Delaware is the nation's scrapple capital. Mystery meat and cousin to North Carolina's livermush, it's basically assorted pig parts which are stewed, minced, mixed with spices, cornmeal and flour, and then baked into small loaves. Slice it off, fry it up and serve it for breakfast.

Michael Ventura / Alamy Stock Photo

Maine: Lobster rolls

Think fresh, chilled lobster meat on a toasted or warm hot dog bun, seasoned with salt and pepper, maybe a touch of mayo and a drizzle of butter. Savor it on a paper plate in front of a seafood shack on the rocky Maine coast and you have an unforgettable, authentic food experience, says Andrew Zimmern, host of the Travel Channel show Bizarre Foods. His go-to spot for lobster rolls is Five Islands Lobster Co., not far from Portland, where “you can literally watch the lobsters come from the traps to the boat to the dock. The lobster you pick has never seen a refrigerator — it’s from the water to the pot to your plate.”

Maryland: Blue crabs

Marylanders are nuts about crabs, which come from the Chesapeake Bay. They can be eaten as a cake or as a whole in the soft shell, but the very best and totally messiest way to eat them is steamed and smothered in Old Bay seasoning mix on a picnic table covered in newspaper or oil cloth — so you can smash them with a mallet and pick out the sweet meat. Here, it's an unforgettable rite of summer.

"Without a doubt, I would drive from Minnesota, where I live, just to have a sandwich at my favorite cheesesteak and pork-sandwich store in America, John’s Roast Pork in Philadelphia."

Massachusetts: New England clam chowder

Sure, you can find this richly flavored cream-based soup of clams, clam juice, onions, salt pork or bacon, and potatoes beyond the Northeast, sometimes listed as Boston clam chowder. You won’t get a better bowl, though, than when it’s made with fresh, sweet local bivalves in a state with such a strong chowder (or, as they say in these parts, “chowdah”) tradition. Herman Melville set an entire chapter of Moby Dick, his 1851 novel, in a Nantucket chowder house. Top spots for the soup in Boston are the city’s oldest restaurant, the Union Oyster House (established 1826), where it’s served chunky with oyster crackers, and nearby Ned Devine’s, an Irish pub in the Faneuil Hall Marketplace, which offers an award-winning version. Note that if your chowdah has tomatoes, you’re probably not in New England that’s a New York thing.

New Hampshire: Apple cider

While it wasn’t named the official beverage until 2010, the Granite State has been pressing fresh apple cider since Colonial times. It comes in the form of the traditional sweet apple juice and as alcoholic hard cider. But most delectable may be the apple cider doughnuts found around the state during autumn harvest.

New Jersey: Saltwater taffy

Tourists in beach towns across America risk their teeth on this wax-paper-wrapped bite-sized treat, which got its start in the late 19th century in Atlantic City. Travelers would line up on the boardwalk at night to watch a machine pull and stretch the taffy, and then wrap and cut it. The chewy sweet actually doesn’t contain salt. Legend claims its name comes from a candymaker’s offhand remark after his shop had been flooded with sea water. When a little girl asked for a piece of candy, the frustrated man muttered, “You mean saltwater taffy?” It now comes in a bewildering number of flavors, from banana split to hot buttered rum.

Robert K. Chin / Alamy Stock Photo

New York: Bagel

There is no substitute for a New York bagel . ask any New Yorker. Some claim it’s the water that makes them unmatchable, and even New Yorkers argue about who makes the best. But many agree that they're tastiest eaten with a "schmear" of cream cheese and maybe a slice of lox. A traditional bagel is formed by hand and then boiled and baked, a process that should give it a crispy crust and a dense interior.

Pennsylvania: Shoofly pie

Made by the Amish in Lancaster County since the 1880s, shoofly is a gooey, supersweet pie made with brown sugar and molasses. Historians say it was first made as a cake, with pie crust added to make it easier to eat with your hands, and that it was typically eaten for breakfast (and may have attracted flies when left on the windowsill to cool). Dutch Haven is said to make the best in the county. Another iconic Pennsylvania food that must be mentioned: the Philly cheesesteak, the famously Philadelphian sandwich made with thinly sliced beef, onions and cheese on a sub/hoagie roll.

Tell us what we missed (or just got wrong) at #greatstatefood

Rhode Island: Stuffies

The state’s shellfish delicacy starts with the quahog, a hard clam that flourishes in Narragansett Bay and is often used in clam chowder. For stuffies, chefs fill the shells with a buttery mixture of bread, minced clams, garlic, onions and sausage, and bake until toasty brown. They’re served in the shells, often with lemon and hot pepper sauce on the side. The stuffie epitomizes the state’s character, says David Dadekian, publisher of the Eat Drink RI newsletter. “There’s frugality in the bread stuffing and the eating of a relatively tough shellfish. … And Rhode Island’s rich immigrant heritage adds the sausage.”

Vermont: Maple creemee

Some who hail from New England call a cone or cup of frozen soft serve a creemee, but it’s not a "real" Vermont creemee without pure Vermont maple syrup and maple sugar. Although all creemees contain the basic dairy ingredients of milk, cream and sugar, most creemees use a high butterfat ratio that produces an ultra-luscious silky treat. You can find creemees at farm stands, ice cream shops and even gas stations, especially in summer.



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